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SigloV

Italy Abandoned Church near Lucca, Italy - July 2014

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I'm just back from a very enjoyable holiday in the hills above Lucca in Tuscany, Italy. The villa we were staying in had a fascinating surprise in store for us. The villa came with it's own abandoned chapel. It was quite small and the rafters and the vestibule were inhabited by a colony of bats. Much of the paraphernalia of the church had just been left to decay, collect dust and bat droppings. Very low light and having no tripod with me meant I had to resort to high ISO and wide apertures for most of the time. Anyways - hope you like this little insight into the past of a small church in rural Tuscany...

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Edited by SigloV

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