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Gregx

Belgium Eglise Du Solitaire - 2014

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After a very hot and especially fail day we went to the last location of the day

Eglise du solitaire was finally a bingo after 6 fails

Excited as hell when we could get in but then a huge smell of pigeons**t all over the place made us feel a bit sick =D

But we managed to survive and stayed for about an hour and a half

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Edited by skeleton key

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that's correct mookster

The place is locked up again after some guys had the idea to start stealing stuff in there

since there's a cemetary build on the church and still having visitors it was too easy 2 see the entrance :(

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