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The Wombat

UK Abercwmeiddaw slate mine, Corris Uchaf, Wales, Jul14

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Was great to be back hiking in Snowdonia, and although our weekend was focused around hiking & beer, we found ourselves having a quick peek back at this derelict mine near the lovely village of Corris. We stumbled across this a few years back, and I was keen to have a proper look round, and see inside the ‘binoculars’. These are testing bore holes apparently. It looks like a large section has crumbled away, as the tubes continue on another outcrop.

The slate mine was worked between the 1860s and the early 1950s.

Explored with KM punk… and a reluctant Non member.

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through the binoculars

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into the mine

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thanks for looking :)

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This looks pretty fantastic mate, did my first Welsh mine last weekend and definitely got a taste for seeing more, this looks like a goodun to me :thumb

:comp:

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      First things first - this place is a death-trap. Simple as that. And it's quite likely to be worse now than it was when I went. But as I have a bit of an obsession about redundant old cinemas and theatres I left all common sense at the entrance.
       
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      Light in the darkness by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr
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      Maenofferen was first worked for slate by men from the nearby Diphwys quarry shortly after 1800. By 1848 slate was being shipped via the Ffestiniog Railway, but traffic on the railway ceased in 1850. In 1857 traffic resumed briefly and apart from a gap in 1865, a steady flow of slate was dispatched via the railway. The initial quarry on the site was known as the David Jones quarry which was the highest and most easterly of what became the extensive Maenofferen complex.
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