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extreme_ironing

Belgium Agnus Dei - Sept. 2014

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Dropped by here with The_Raw, Sentinel, and 3 non-members. People call it Agnus Dei but I can't find any distinct reason for that tbh. Beyond the Chapel which lies on the roadside, there's also a small hospital complex at the rear which has been partially gutted by fire, really dodgy floors here!

Stained glass in the chapel was in great condition overall apart from those on the road facing side which were smeared with pollution. Building was a bit leaky but quite well preserved apart from that, a good amount of peely paint. :D

External of the chapel and the smashed up remains of a previous exploring groups minivan.

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A composite photo of 5 of the windows which were in better condition.

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Chapel interior.

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Latin.

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A small room to the side of the alter, rain was falling heavily through the roof at this moment.

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Part of the hospital area.

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An old chair and TV set in the hospital part of the complex.

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One of several remaining hospital beds.

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A bank? O.o

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Heading back to the van after the storm abated. Some cyclist explorers also joined us mid way thru. :)

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I hadn't seen anything but the chapel at this place before so was a nice surprise to see there's a bit more to this place. Would love to find out more about it's history but doubt that'd be easy without a name to go by...

Thanks for reading. :)

Edited by extreme_ironing
Adding date

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As soon as I set eyes on that stained glass I made a mess in my underpants, amazing!! and the rest is good of course! Stained glass windows to me is like peely paint to others! :)

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Lovely shots! I visited this place in october and was bummed that the bus was gone, especially now when i see your visit just a few weeks before haha.

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