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    • By Britain's Decays
      Last year we tried to get in Scarborough sports centre but they have seriously locked that place up tight, nothing on the roof, no tunnels or anything.So we just made a short video of the outside. Today I went back with the newest member of our URBEX team, the drone and got some higher up shots. Here are the photos from the drone...
       
       





    • By Forgotten ulster
      History :
      Casement Park (Irish: Páirc Mhic Asmaint) is the principal Gaelic Athletic Association stadium in Belfast, Northern Ireland, home to the Antrim football and hurling teams. Located on the Andersonstown Road in the west of the city, and named after the Republican revolutionary Sir Roger Casement (1864-1916), the ground has a capacity of 32,600.[1]
      Casement Park, one of the largest stadia in Ulster, opened in June 1953, with Armagh Harps defeating St John’s of Antrim in the final of the inaugural Ulster Senior Club Football Championship.[2] The newly opened Casement Park hosted the Ulster Championship final less than a month later, which saw Armagh overcome reigning All-Ireland champions Cavan.
      In all, Casement Park has hosted eight Ulster football finals. However, the Antrim ground has not held the provincial showpiece since 1971, with St. Tiernach's Park in Clones hosting the final every year since except between 2004 and 2006 when it was moved to Croke Park such was the demand for tickets. A major facelift of the stadium took place in 2000, a move which saw more championship games played at Casement Park. In 2006, floodlights were added which allowed hurling and football to be played in the evening.
      In 2006, proposals were raised to build a new multi-purpose stadium on the site of the old Maze prison near Lisburn, which was intended to host association football, rugby union and Gaelic games. However, opposition to the idea led to it being dropped in favour of a new venue in the Sydenham area of East Belfast. This led to Ulster GAA, which was one of the partners in the Maze project, to pull out in favour of remaining at Casement Park.[3]
      In 2011, the Northern Ireland Executive announced that it had granted £138m for various stadium redevelopment projects throughout Northern Ireland. Ulster GAA would receive £61.4m of this, which was to be used to redevelop Casement Park into a 40,000 all-seated stadium with £15 million of partnership investment from the Central Council of the GAA, making it the largest stadium in Ulster.[4]
      In early 2012 it was announced that the redevelopment work would start at the end of 2013 with a view to having the new stadium open by September 2015. It was expected that, after its completion, Ulster GAA would move its headquarters from St Tiernach's Park in Clones to Casement Park,[5] which would then have a seating capacity of about 40,000.[6]
      In December 2014 the granting of planning permission for the redevelopment of Casement Park was ruled unlawful.
      On 28 April 2016 the team behind the Casement Park redevelopment proposals launched a consultation process in an effort to see what the general public's views are. On the 14th November 2016 Casement Park was officially included as part of Ireland's 2023 Rugby World Cup bid.
      2006 controversy
      A decision in 2006 by the Antrim County Board to permit the use of Casement Park to host a Republican rally in commemoration of the deaths of Provisional IRA and INLAprisoners in the 1981 hunger strike drew criticisms from unionists.
       
      Visited in late 2015, casement lies the same today although work on redevelopment is expected to start very soon. knowing the social club was still in use allowed access to part of the ground and the rest i just had to blagg.























    • By oldskool
      A revisit @ The Christallerie didnt have much time first visit .........
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      If anyone can tell what the House Of Esher was going to be i would love to know visited with Critical Mass & Host
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      Cheers for looking Oldskool .........
    • By Siren
      This place is definately an oldie but a goodie. I recently came across an article about this place, only to discover it is now being sold as a half a million pound house! Personally I prefer how I found it....
      The History -
      Buckston Browne farm was built in 1931 by the Royal College of Surgeons as an animal testing and vivisection laboratory. The farm was stimulated by a gift from Sir George Buckston Browne F.R.C.S. and was later ‘modernised’ in the 1960s with new accommodation blocks, kitchen, laundry, operating theatres, operating microscopes, orthopaedic instruments, diathermy and portable X-ray units. Two large enclosed blocks of 20 animal pens were also added, suitable for dogs, pigs, goats, sheep and calves which were all tested on in the farm. The farm was used by a number of institutions who endorsed animal testing, but finally ceased experimentations after anti-vivisection raids in 1984.
      The Explore -
      We've all had days where all the planning, research and effort to get places falls to pieces and leaves you without one successful explore all day! This was the complete opposite, we descended upon Kent and had an amazing day visting many locations. This was by far the winner of the day. Despite the gruesome history of the place, the summer sun made it pleasant!
      THEN:


      These cages did upset me quite a lot! I almost forgot what I was exploring till this point.



      Not sure I want to know what this was....


      NOW:

      Yours for half a million pounds!!
      Thanks for looking guys!
    • By Mrbeardo
      Visited with my second favourite ginger woman,toby and wakey
      Brogyntyn Hall has stood abandoned for 15 years. was owned by the Lord Harlech until 2000. Settled in the 1600s the house and its estate once presided over the land as far as the eye can see. The family was one of the great English dynasties and owners of Harlech Castle in North Wales as well.
      Unfortunately a string of tragedies including two Lords Harlech dying without wills, leaving massive death duties to be paid, saw the decline of the family fortunes and subsequent sale of the Hall. Interestingly it was also used during the war by British Telecom as headquarters for communications for the spy network operating in Europe.










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