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The_Raw

Ukrane Apartment block rooftops, Pripyat - October 2014

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Pripyat is a ghost town in northern Ukraine, near the border with Belarus.

Named after the nearby Pripyat River, Pripyat was founded on 4 February 1970, the ninth nuclear city in the Soviet Union, for the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. It was officially proclaimed a city in 1979, and had grown to a population of 49,360 before being evacuated a few days after the 26 April 1986 Chernobyl disaster.

Though Pripyat is located within the administrative district of Ivankiv Raion, the abandoned city now has a special status within the larger Kiev Oblast (province), being administered directly from Kiev. Pripyat is also supervised by Ukraine's Ministry of Emergencies, which manages activities for the entire Chernobyl Exclusion Zone.

We took a look around in some of the apartment blocks, there were some random bits of furniture here and there but mostly empty flats rotting away. The real highlight was the view from the rooftops overlooking the silent town of Pripyat with the Chernobyl power plant in the background. It's a spectacle that you will never forget, a town once home to 50,000 people now overgrown with trees and nothing but the whistling of the wind to break the silence. Well, with the exception of us burping, farting, laughing and swearing for three days :D

Took these pictures from two different rooftops.

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Saw a few of these paintings dotted around

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Trashed flat with bits of furniture

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Piano in a flat

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The hospital with the sarcophagus covering reactor 4 in the background

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More artwork

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The ferris wheel in the distance

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One of the tallest buildings in Pripyat, it was from here that people watched the multicoloured plume of burning blue, yellow and green fire from the reactor light up the night sky, unaware they were receiving a potentially lethal dose of radiation.

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Power plant covered with a sarcophagus to contain the mess

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Throughout Eastern Europe symbols of the Soviet Union have been torn down, but in Pripyat, where the year is still 1986, the wreathed hammer, sickle and star of the USSR still adorns buildings (on the left of shot).

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Looking down

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The sunset

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Empty streets

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Thanks for looking :thumb

Edited by The_Raw

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Stunning mate, been wanting to visit ever since I heard about it. Literally can't wait. Shots are epic. Always wondered if anyone got into the morgue of the hospital? Heard it's pretty dated. Epic rooftops man, would love to sit up there and watch the sun fall behind the horizon. :thumb

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Thanks mate, yes you can get into the morgue in the hospital, I didn't see it for myself but most of our group got to see it. To be honest it barely resembles anything now let alone a morgue, there is some form of slab still but it hardly even looks like a slab and that's the only thing left in there....

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Its got to be an odd feeling walking through a place like that and no doubt has quite impact.

Great set of high there mate and glad you all made it back without glowing like the ReadyBreak kids :thumb

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Its got to be an odd feeling walking through a place like that and no doubt has quite impact.

Great set of high there mate and glad you all made it back without glowing like the ReadyBreak kids :thumb

Yeah it's bizarre mate, would recommend anyone to go even if it is a tourist bus hotspot :D

Not quite glowing but I've had some form of manflu ever since I got back pretty much :(

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