Jump to content
Rolo

Belgium Agnus Dei - October 2014

Recommended Posts

When we arrived on this location we heard a lot of noise coming from inside the church, didn't know what to think of it so we slowly walked through the house towards the church. To discover the noise was comming from a generator. Turns out there were some people doing a photoshoot, with lights and topless guys with bodypaint.....Ok :rolleyes: We decided to explore the house first and wait until they were gone. But after 40 minutes or so they were stil there. So we stepped up to them and asked whats up. So my friend spoke to them (Germans), and agreed that we could go in and take some shots. So we did and left after 15 minutes.

1.

15585059916_52c45cbca6_c.jpg

2.

15422099079_aea4115615_c.jpg

3.

15585057316_76957a7d8c_c.jpg

4.

14988587273_1c4b526588_c.jpg

5.

15422095819_e5fd6270ba_c.jpg

6.

15609562442_88b34f175e_c.jpg

https://www.flickr.com/photos/21392885@N04/sets/72157648513146947/

Cheers!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice mate, really sorry to hear about the topless guys and body paint though, if it were topless women I guess you might spend all day there :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks!

Very nice mate, really sorry to hear about the topless guys and body paint though, if it were topless women I guess you might spend all day there :D

Haha true that :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Similar Content

    • By The_Raw
      Another visit from October with @Andy, @Maniacand@extreme_ironing. From seeing Andy's report I missed quite a few bits but you can't see everything unless you spend the whole day down there. Another epic bit of WW2 history and there's lots more out there.   
       
      Ouvrage Mont des Welches, a gros ouvrage of the Maginot Line fortifications, is part of the Fortified Sector of Boulay. It comprises two entrance blocks, one infantry block, one artillery block, one observation block and two combination blocks. The underground gallery system is compact, about 200 metres (660 ft) from end to end, and unlike larger ouvrages where the gallery system is linear in concept, the central portion of Mont des Welches is a dense network of tunnels crossing one another, housing the barracks and utility areas. The galleries are excavated at an average depth of up to 30 metres (98 ft). Unlike most gros ouvrages, its 60 cm internal rail network was not electrified, relying on human power to move the rail cars. Relatively small for a gros ouvrage, Mont des Welches saw a brief period of sharp action in June 1940, when German forces moving along the rear of the Maginot Line engaged the position without success. The manning of the ouvrage in June 1940 comprised 490 men and 17 officers of the 167th Fortress Infantry Regiment and the 151st Position Artillery Regiment. After modest renovations in the 1950s, it was abandoned in the 1970s.
       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
        
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
      Bon journée  
    • By Cranked side
      Hello all! Time for my second post here.. This time something different again then my previous one.
      Last Sunday a friend and i had no clue what to do.. So we've left somewhat late in the morning to this "little-big" slatemine, that i still had to visit..
      It used to be a bigger mine back in the days , but due to flooded levels and collapses that happend during the years, only a small bit of it is still explorable.
      Complete darkness once you've turned off the flashlight, and only the noise of water falling on the floor.
      Still some equipment was left inside this mine... i wonder what the flooded levels have left.. It looks like their have been divers in there before..
      Spend 3hours and a half inside of the mine.. Once outside we where back in the snow ! Was actually way warmer inside of it then outside
      Was a bit difficult lighting out all the pictures, but the end result is good afterall
       
      Anyway one great piece of history!
       
      Light in the darkness by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr
      Light in the darkness by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr
      Light in the darkness by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr
      Light in the darkness by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr
      Light in the darkness by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr
      Light in the darkness by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr
      Light in the darkness by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr
      Light in the darkness by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr
      Light in the darkness by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr
      Light in the darkness by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr
      Light in the darkness by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr
      Light in the darkness by Laurens Dufour, on Flickr
       
       
    • By The_Raw
      This fortress was constructed by the Germans from 1907-1914. It served German soldiers during the First World War but saw little action. Then it was occupied by the French between 1919 & 1940, where it was incorporated into the maginot line for WWII. After the departure of French troops in June 1940, the German army took back the fort. On September 2, 1944, it was declared a fortress of the Reich by Hitler. The stronghold must therefore be defended until the last extremity by German troops, whose chiefs all took an oath to the Führer. In October 1944, the fort was captured by the American 3rd Army in the Battle of Metz.
       
      Definitely one of the best military sites I've visited yet. Amazing to think it served both WWI & WWII yet remains in such good condition today. There are dozens of murals dating back over a century, and 1,700m of tunnels connecting various sections. I had to be dragged away as I could have spent a week in here. Visited with @Maniac @extreme_ironing and @Andy.
       
       

       
       

       
      "Flourish German fatherland"

       
       "Cameroon child in Munich" / "Man does not agree"

       
       "Booze kills, so do not drink so much!" (or something to that effect....)

       
      "Beautiful is the recruit life"

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
      "Whoever quarrels or rushes gets the hell out of it"

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
      "May God punish England" 

       
      Thanks for looking y'all
    • By franconiangirl
      I have hardly any information about this former boarding school. Apparently it was an institute for boys only. The building is in a decaying state. Fortunately, the vandalism isn´t too bad so far. The size of this insitution almost kills you. It´s very emotional to explore this part of history, when obviously a stong religious belief was one of the most important parts of education. 

      As already mentioned above, this institution was huge. It´s picturesquely embedded between hills. It consisted not only of numerous dormitories and classrooms but its own chapel  and infirmary - with rusty bed frames and old medical stuff left behind - as well. You´ll find traces of religious importance again and again, for example old images of saints - to remind you over and over about the importance of a strong belief that was once an omnipresent theorem in this institution. Let the pictures speak for themselves. 


























       
    • By franconiangirl
      Recently, I´ve visited "Mold House". Of course, more than well-known. When I first set my eyes on pictures of that house with its amazing colours and its state of decay, I instantly fell in love. I´m glad I could fulfill my dream of visiting that place. I especially loved the pink colour of the armchairs being sokaed into the carpet. 


       

       

       

       

       

       

×