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UK Easington Colliery Primary School - August 2014

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Easington Colliery Primary School was built in 1911-13 to accommodate the growing number of children in the booming mining town. The school consisted of two identical buildings separated by two yards with a dividing wall. One building was for boys and the other for girls. The lower floor of each building was for infants and the top floor for seniors.

The school could accommodate 1,296 children. Built by architects J Morson of Durham in the Baroque style it cost £21,000 to build. The buildings served their purpose until their closure in the late 1990s. Since then the site was acquired by a development company who applied for planning permission to build 39 homes. English Heritage opposed the plan and achieved listed building status, resulting in the buildings standing empty and falling into decay ever since.

Visited with Proj3ct M4yh3m, Kriegaffe9 and Cowboy55.

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1. Sunlight floods into a decaying classroom

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2. Through a classroom door

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3. Decaying Classroom

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4. Light fills the classroom

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5. Blackboards and chalk remain

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6. School-work on a desk

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7. Chalk and a dictionary

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8. The teachers chair

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9. A trolley in the hall

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10. One of the sports/assembly halls

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11. Another view of one of the halls

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12. Decaying corridor

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13. Huge windows in corridor

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14. Chair in a corridor

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15. Light shines on chair

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16. Box house

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17. "Let's Explore" Books on a desk

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18. Chairs in a classroom

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19. Another classroom

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20. Wide view of classroom

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21. Classroom from the back

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22. Through classroom door

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23. Classroom almost ready for the next lesson

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24. Sinks in a bathroom

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25. Old cloakroom area

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26. Cloakroom with sink and drinking fountain

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27. Tall rooms with high ceilings and big windows

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28. Another tall classroom

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29. Decay at top of stairs

Thanks for looking.

View all my reports at www.bcd-urbex.com

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Nice set of pictures, but what is the point in the english heritage giving it a status for it to just fall into decay?!

Yes I agree, often the case unfortunately. I understand it's currently being demolished so it hasn't done much good!

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