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Wevsky

France GRS Network Paris Catacombs December 2014

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This was originally an invite kindly offered by Mr Jobs for me and the wife,the wife had to decline due to ill health so i jumped at the chance of 3 days under paris with a bunch of strange chaps in waders.

Was picked up by Maniac along with non member Mr perry to then head to dover to meet Bigjobs,Paradox,Fb,James and amy and then head out on the 2.15 ferry!
Bit of car trouble and a sleep later we are all on our way into Paris to find our entry point.
Once inside i have to say it was pretty full on with the pace and we spent the majority of the time on the march from one area to the next and from what i can gather we did some milage from the very north to the furthest south of this section with many stop off's in-between,i didnt have chance to grab as many pictures as i wanted to due to the camera being buried under the kit i took and for not wanting to hold the rest of the group up constantly setting up shots,and to be fair there is no real way to get my gear out safely when your ball deep in water.

Really enjoyed this trip and the party nye was a great end to the night with some really decent people.

Enough waffle and on with the pictures that i did manage to get..Just a final massive thanks to all concerned ,it was a great trip and one i wont forget in a hurry ;)

Pics in no particular order..


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People with maps who know where im going..

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Pic heavy alert

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And my favourite picture

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Thanks to all involved couldn't have imagined a more decent a way to spent NYE..

Edited by Wevsky

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That's wicked mate, loving some of the bits and pieces you discovered down there, especially that miniature castle and those old steps leading to nowhere :thumb

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That's epic Wevs!! Show us some more!!

there the best of the lot but i have more, and there not bad,just not uploaded anywhere..ill try sort it out at some point mate

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