Jump to content
hamtagger

UK Lincoln Cathedral Roof, Lincolnshire - (Jun 2014) Jan 2015

Recommended Posts

Lincoln Cathedral Roof

The Explore

A considerable amount of planning, recce'ing and good old fashioned snooping went into this one. Myself and Matt_Inked had been chatting about the possibilities of pulling this one off for quite a while. During a recent recce trip we were only expecting to confirm that it couldn't be done due to the immense about of CCTV around the place and rather high barricades. Literally 5 or 6 hours of walking around the Cathedral over several different days and a lot of time sittting in the car just staring up at the roof almost was enough send us on our ways defeated. But no, an oppurtunity presented itself and we returned a few days later for the entry and climb, then the ass-twitching descent....

The Recce's

14474963856_e424ea4f4e.jpg 14311606327_380db42f0c.jpg

14311610037_3416df8171.jpgWestern Elevation14496876522_c930ef0de5.jpg

Brief History

Lincoln Cathedral is a cathedral located in Lincoln in England and seat of the Bishop of Lincoln in the Church of England. Building commenced in 1088 and continued in several phases throughout the medieval period. It was reputedly the tallest building in the world for 238 years (1311–1549). According to the cathedral website, over £1 million a year is spent keeping the cathedral in shape; the most recent project completed has been the restoration of the West Front in 2000, and a matrix of tall scaffolding is slowly making its way around the building...

Top 'o' the scaff

1.

14492321822_6711fd545a_c.jpg

2.

14470428526_77c6d79309_c.jpg

3.

14306919758_2ee8433287_c.jpg

4.

14306894350_2670a8eaf4_c.jpg

5.

14306925899_6b801997a1_c.jpg

6.

14306917589_a48a466cc9_c.jpg

7.

14470416026_5a0e624a71_c.jpg

8.

14306913779_1fa6f874ce_c.jpg

9/10.

14513641133_75416711fe.jpg14306925899_6b801997a1.jpg

As always, thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated :thumb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks epic mate, did something similar up north and it was really amazing to get so close to that architecture that you normally only see from the ground. Good work :thumb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cheers mate. Yeah it was good to get up there, and isn't scaffolding so flipping noisy when you're trying to be quiet lol?!

There's a higher section of scaff that i've been keeping an eye on, next time i need to get some decent camera night settings from someone as i was winging it for this one haha

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Similar Content

    • By Andy
      Formerly a cable factory was here (founded in 1837, closed in 2008, partially demolished). The air raid shelter was for the company's employees.   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9    
    • By Andy
      The oldest parts of the church dates back to the 12th century, the octagonal tower was added in the 13th century. The windows were renewed in the 15th century and the roof in 1633. Further renovations took place in 1867 and 1874. The church was closed in 1987, but it's maintained until today.   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16    
    • By Zen1991
      So this is my first post on this forum, I found out about these houses on a Abandoned Lincolnshire group on Facebook and thought they were definitely worth a trip, but... the first trip wasn't very successful, the address for these houses took us to two houses on the other side of Withcall that were at one point abandoned but have since been knocked down, so after about half an hour of looking around it became very clear the houses weren't there.
       
      After talking to the person who posted them originally and finding out the real location we headed back up to find them. We had to make sure we kept quiet as there is a neighbor attached to the 2nd station house and we weren't sure they'd have appreciated a night time visit from 3 explorers haha. 
       
      Access to the house is easy, the doors being left open is always convenient. Walking around the houses only took 30 minutes or so , but was still a nice little explore. It's one of them places that besides a few repairs and some serious wallpapering, it looks like the family could just walk back through the front door and pick up their lives where they left off which gave the houses a real creepy vibe.
       
      I guess that's all that really needs to be said about these houses. Here's a few pictures: 
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      Thanks for reading:) 
    • By woopashoopaa
      I visited this place with @Dangle_Angle and @Lavino after the main target of the day was a fail. Thanks to Lavino driving us here and even tho they had already been they also enjoyed the place to. I also got to learn how to use the camera a bit better . The inside of this place is amazing because the whole place hardly has any graffiti and the place is in pretty good condition. Also the whole place is made out of wood which gives a very nice feel to the place. Anyway here is some pictures and some history, hope you enjoy .

      George Barnsley and Sons Ltd. (founded 1836) They were in Cornish Place on the Don and specialised in forge filing and cutting tools for leather workers and shoe makers. One George Barnsley was Master Cutler in 1883.:

      George Barnsley and Son is listed in the 1837 Sheffield directory as a file manufacture situated on Wheeldon Street, The 1849 listing records a move to Cornhill and the 1852 to Cornesh works Cornesh street they had by this time also increased there product range to include steel files, shoe and butchers knives.

      They are again listed in 1944 as manufactures of files and blades shoe knives and leather workers tools.

      In the 1948 listing the business had become George Barnsley and Son Ltd

      George Barnsley died at his home at No 30 Collegiate Crescent on 30th March 1958, he lived there with his wife Mabel and mother-in-law Elizabeth. He was a partner in the firm which were steel and file manufacturers and the business was converted into a limited company about 10 years before his death.

      He had a long army career, joining up in 1896 and serving in the Boer war and two world wars. Colonel Barnsley played a leading part in the development of the Army Cadet Force in Sheffield. He Died Aged 83. (History from Lavino)
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

Disclaimer

Oblivion State exists as an online forum to allow like minded individuals to share their experiences of Urban Exploration. We do not condone breaking and entering or other criminal activity and advise all members to read the FAQ articles about the forum and urban exploring in general. All posts are the responsibility of the original poster and all images remain copyright to the original photographer.

We would just like to thank

Forum user AndyK! from Behind Closed Doors for our rather excellent new logo.

All of our fantastic team of Moderators who volunteer their time to keep this place running smoothly.

All of our members for continuing to support Oblivion State by posting up the most awesome content. Thank you everyone!
×