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urblex

Dead Things - Not For The Squeamish -2015 (NSFW)

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Poor little bugger, whatever happened doesn't look like he went peacefully.

2 for one at the seminary, this place is the gift that keeps on giving when it comes to dead birds

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And one from St Josephs seminary, think it's a sparrowhawk & think it explains the amount of dead pigeons in there (apparently they kill & eat them)

0aad7c1b-a64c-4114-b878-d473ce949bef_zpsuxubfrae.jpg

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^lol yeah asked my dad who knows a lot more about birds than me & he reckons it's actually an owl, cant remember what type of owl but apparently its definitely an owl. Nice additions as well btw :D

Edited by urblex
lousy spelling

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Interesting. Got this from winstanly hall. No bloody idea what it is but deffo creepy lol.

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Nice one mate, guessing it's some sort of bird, does look pretty cool though, er i mean creepy

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Nice one mate, guessing it's some sort of bird, does look pretty cool though, er i mean creepy

Dont it just. Imagine walked in on this with just my torch nearly had a bloody heart attack with it lying on a bench. When the light hit it thought it was a fooking baby or some shit at first glance cause of the shape of skull lol. SCARED CAT at heart lmfao.

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