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Landie_Man

-(sort of permission) St Mary's Church, Buckinghamshire, Jan 2015

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Funny one this really. I’ve known about it for years but thought I’d go and check it out, its situated fairly near my house and there is a public footpath going through a yard which leads to the building. The place is “open to all†but first a key must be obtained from a local shop and they decide whether to let you in or not.

The church is kind of derelict but its looked after by The Churches Conservation Trust. I chanced it and found a way in, so its kind of part permission visit, part not. I don’t like to think of it like a proper tourist explore with "turnstiles", opening hours and a gift shop, because its not, its disused and looked after but its not got a reception, entry fee or staff moping around.

Its dusty, dark and cold inside and certainly doesn’t have the “organised†feel of a site you can “visitâ€Â.

The church would have served parts of Aylesbury which no longer exist, and Quarrendon Village which is now a well known local Housing Estate.

St Marys is designated by English Heritage as a Grade II listed building and is under the care of the Churches Conservation Trust. John Wesley preached his very first sermon in the church soon after he was ordained deacon in September of 1725.

The church originally dates from the 12th and 13th centuries, and could well stand on the site of an earlier church.

Some Alterations were made in the 14th and 15th centuries and a full restoration in 1868 by George Gilbert Scott.�* By the 20th January 1972 the church was declared redundant and was vested in the Churches Conservation Trust on 24 October 1973.

There was some work done on it in the last few years and money spent, including a one day licence so that a local family could have a wedding inside, but apart from that, its just there for local interest.

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Guestbook went back to 1983

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