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Lazarus

Hi from Preston

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Welcome fellow Prestonian! Just seen your St Joe's report which was impressive :)

I reckon we should get all the Preston lads (and lasses) together and go on a big exploring mission. I need something to get me out again lol

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  • Similar Content

    • By macc_explore
      The Explore
      So having already done this place a few months back we ended up in the area eating some delicious KFC and thought it would be rude not to have a stroll down to Joes and try our luck.. Old access points had been sealed very well and the main gate is now covered in new razor wire but were theres a will theres a way and all that
       
      The History
      St Joseph’s Orphanage was opened in 1872 on the site of an ancient alms house, and St Joseph’s Hospital for the Sick Poor followed five years later.

      They were built by wealthy widow Maria Holland, who gave £10,000 at a time when Preston had one of the worst mortality rates in the country, due to poor housing and low-paid mill workers. St Joseph’s Orphanage cared for 971 children before it closed in 1954.

      Run by the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady Mother of Mercy, the orphanage was the first welfare provider for Roman Catholic girls in Preston, taking in up to 60 youngsters at a time in two dormitories.

      After its closure, the top floor of the orphanage continued to serve as accommodation for the nuns who worked in St Joseph’s Hospital, known locally as Mount Street Hospital.

      The hospital held collections to help pay for health care for poor patients. During the First and Second World Wars, they tended injured soldiers and, over the years, tens of thousands of babies were born at the hospital’s maternity unit. Legendary performer George Formby died at the hospital following a heart attack on March 6, 1961. The hospital closed when the last sisters left nursing in 1982. It later became a care home, which closed down more than ten years ago.
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

    • By macc_explore
      The Explore
      This is one that's been on my list for a long while now but always been sealed or never got around to going up there. On hearing it was open again we popped to have a look. I'm sure more reports will come from here as there was 14 other explorers here at the time! Like a Xmas urbex get together
       
      Place is fairly trashed now unfortunately and feel we were a few years too late on this one, lots of fire and water damage is slowly destroying this building but a good fun explore with some great people anyhow
       
      The History
      St Joseph’s Orphanage was opened in 1872 on the site of an ancient alms house, and St Joseph’s Hospital for the Sick Poor followed five years later. 
      They were built by wealthy widow Maria Holland, who gave £10,000 at a time when Preston had one of the worst mortality rates in the country, due to poor housing and low-paid mill workers. St Joseph’s Orphanage cared for 971 children before it closed in 1954. 
      Run by the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady Mother of Mercy, the orphanage was the first welfare provider for Roman Catholic girls in Preston, taking in up to 60 youngsters at a time in two dormitories.
      After its closure, the top floor of the orphanage continued to serve as accommodation for the nuns who worked in St Joseph’s Hospital, known locally as Mount Street Hospital.
       The hospital held collections to help pay for health care for poor patients. During the First and Second World Wars, they tended injured soldiers and, over the years, tens of thousands of babies were born at the hospital’s maternity unit. Legendary performer George Formby died at the hospital following a heart attack on March 6, 1961. The hospital closed when the last sisters left nursing in 1982. It later became a care home, which closed down more than ten years ago.
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

    • By coolboyslim
      Intro.
      Ok got bored being in all time has you do so decided to go out and explore. Wanted to do this for quite a while so went down solo (At First). When i got there was checking out the place and access etc when i found it a damn car pulled up and sat for ages right outside. So grabbed some grub and heading back where i spotted a lady right near access and was having a nosy lol. So i introduced myself would be rude not to. Turned out it was Hedgie with another person i didn't catch name sorry just coming out. After some good pointers i realized its way to much just for me solo and with night upon me so called for reinforcements. An hour later my friends turned up Tina and tony. Then off we went. All i can say was this was one of the most fun and awesome places i have been for a while. Loved it and hope you like pics.
      History.
      St Joseph's Hospital was erected on Mount Street, Preston in 1877 by Mrs Maria Holland for the benefit of the sick poor. It was opened in 1879 and run by the Sisters of Charity of our Lady Mother of Mercy, who also ran St Joseph's Orphanage in Theatre street. In 1884, it opened up two rooms as accommodation for private patients, and during the First World War it provided care for wounded soldiers (often Belgians). The Hospital was later recognised as a training centre for nurses, and accepted its first trainees in 1958. The Hospital closed in the late 1980s,The Sisters of Charity are still based in Mount Street at Provincial House.
      St Joseph̢۪s is a Grade II listed former orphanage and maternity hospital
      developed as a sequence of buildings from 1872 through to the 1950̢۪s. The
      original building is a two storey, red brick building in a high gothic style with
      a tower over the original entrance. The later 1930̢۪s and 1950̢۪s buildings are
      in a simple modernist style in brick. The buildings are arranged around a
      courtyard but one that is hidden from view despite its central location.
      The buildings are an important landmark and a significant part of Preston̢۪s
      Victorian heritage and social history. Although the buildings have consent for
      conversion to residential use they have been vacant for a number of years.
      The site is in private ownership.
      Also this is the place george formby died. Here is an interesting link about this.
      http://www.blogpreston.co.uk/2013/0...george-formbys-death-and-his-link-to-preston/
      Enjoy the pics



















      Thanks for looking. Hope you enjoyed.
    • By Ferox
      This is the first of two visits with the tour guide, also known as Urblex. Thanks for getting me into this place bud. Really enjoyed both visits. Really early one this which suffered from bad light as a result. An interesting entry point which the eagle eye of Urblex had spotted.
      The building is a maze of connecting corridors and rooms, with a mix and match of features. Pretty filthy inside with the lower levels containing a flooded corridor with is raw to say the least. On the other end their is the medical section up stairs and the chapel. It had been on the list from the start and did not disappoint.
      St Joseph's Hospital was erected on Mount Street, Preston in 1877 by Mrs Maria Holland for the benefit of the sick poor. It was opened in 1879 and run by the Sisters of Charity of our Lady Mother of Mercy, who also ran St Joseph's Orphanage in Theatre street. In 1884, it opened up two rooms as accommodation for private patients, and during the First World War it provided care for wounded soldiers (often Belgians). The Hospital was later recognised as a training centre for nurses, and accepted its first trainees in 1958. The Hospital closed in the late 1980s, and is now the Mount Street Nursing Home. The Sisters of Charity are still based in Mount Street at Provincial House.
      DEATH OF A CHARITABLE LADY – HANDSOME LOCAL BEQUETHS
      In our obituary to-day we announce the death of Mrs. Maria Holland, of Bushell-place, at the age of 72. The deceased lady had suffered for some time past from the natural ailments of advanced age, and succumbed to her illness yesterday week. She was a lady possessed of considerable means, and was noted for great liberality, especially among the Roman Catholic community of the town, of which she was a member. She built and largely endowed St Joseph’s Orphanage, in connection with which she has recently caused to be erected a hospital for the sick and dying….








      Thanks for looking.
    • By Lazarus
      First Report
      History:
      St Joseph's Hospital was erected on Mount Street, Preston in 1877 by Mrs Maria Holland for the benefit of the sick poor. It was opened in 1879 and run by the Sisters of Charity of our Lady Mother of Mercy, who also ran St Joseph's Orphanage in Theatre street. In 1884, it opened up two rooms as accommodation for private patients, and during the First World War it provided care for wounded soldiers (often Belgians). The Hospital was later recognised as a training centre for nurses, and accepted its first trainees in 1958. The Hospital closed in the late 1980s, and is now the Mount Street Nursing Home. The Sisters of Charity are still based in Mount Street at Provincial House. (Nicked from the National Archives)
      Visit:
      Visited the site early morning, got there about 6 and met up with Urblex. Found the access was still open and we went in. I say we went in, Urblex got in fine but I was stuck outside. If not for the help from a caring Weelie-Bin then I wouldn't have got in. (Note to self....get better at climbing). Spent about 2 1/2 hours in there, didn't get lost really and got some good photos thought we weren't the only ones in there at one point, sounded like someone was coming down a corridor we had just come from then we saw a car outside but it was empty, no idea who's it was?
      Massive thanks to Urbex though, couldn't have done it without him! Cheers Mate:)
      The Photos:
      #1

      #2

      #3

      #4

      #5

      #6

      #7

      #8

      #9

      #10

      #11

      #12

      #13

      #14

      #15

      #16


      More photos available here
      https://www.flickr.com/photos/urban_lazarus/sets/72157650509957140/


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