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Fekneejit

Weirdness just off J35a M1 (UK)

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Something I've just remembered since I signed up here...

Just off the M1 J35a there's a road called Warren Lane, at the end of which there's a little brick hut with far too much security on the windows. The only time I've walked past it was in shadow & it was before ubiquitous phone torches, I couldn't see a floor in there, but I could hardly see the back wall.

There is a train line running under that hill, but the hut's a good 2-300m off from the line, so if it's an air shaft, or any shaft to the kind of rooms that got built by the diggers then they really went out of their way to go off away from the tunnel. I know a few people in the area, & no-one has any idea what is is, though everyone seems to know which little hut I mean. They all just assume it's something to do with the tunnel. There are two air vents nearby, one just off the northbound M1 sliproad, one in woods nearby, & they're both heavily fortified, & different brickwork to the hut, which unless I'm mistaken is later.

Looks like there's a small sign on the front in the Google Streetview shot I've noticed now too, that wasn't there when I passed it, torture!

Incidentally it sits within a couple of hundred metres of two industrial estates, one of which was where they made Churchill Tanks during WW2 (& the other was the old Izal factory), & the brickwork & flat concrete roof does have a hint of the late 30/early 40s about it.

If anyone's passing (you can only get off going north at J35a) it may be worth shining a torch in, if it's a shaft then it may point to there being side chambers leading off the train tunnel?

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I'm still like a coiled spring waiting for that first splorage report from you, gonna be a good one from what i've seen from you're interests so far :thumb

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I think that could possibly be where the blast door use to be for Newton Chambers War time "UnderGround" Hospital CTC ( Central Treatment Centre ) for the workers Just off Warren Lane .?

I could be wrong as just took a quick glance but looks worthy of further investigation Fekneejit ;)

Theres some mention on access points but didnt see any images?

Some say its a sunken blast proof three room structure ?

Im not sure why some have given it the grand title of hospital as by others desription sound more like a first aid station and there is some mention of a dentist ?

Any way happy hunting and go get your teeth pulled lol :thumb

Edited by skeleton key

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Oh god there's all sorts it could be round there by the look of things...

After reading this, it looks like the hospital part was the other side of the road, & a couple of hundred metres down the hill. It mentions being built in to the hill side & used 'til at least the 60s... Also it was built in to the hill going away from the hut I pictured.

Oh, both of them are on the 1955 OS map...

thorncliffe.jpg

My hut - red outline, hospital - blue outline.

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I didn't realise that place was closed... It'll be very recent & probably secured, if anyone wants a look though there's a footpath from the road about 200m NW of the entrance which leads in to woodland near enough to the fence at the north corner :)

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Update: The factory is far from closed... Full car park, truck going in as I went past.

Gutted, hate it when that happens! Found a few places that looked 'explorable' then to find out they're still in use :(

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      How do lads and lasses.
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    • By WildBoyz
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      As expected, the inside of the tunnel was incredibly muddy. Even sticking close to the walls didn’t help very much. As for the tunnel itself, though, it was, aesthetically speaking, very pleasant. It reminded us of an old Victorian railway tunnel you’d find in the UK. The condition of some of the bricks in the Chain Hills Tunnel are quite poor too, which enhances its overall photogenicity. Other than that, however, there isn’t a lot else to see. That’s the nature of old railway tunnels unfortunately. We did find a couple of niches and a few pipes belonging to the sewer system, but they’re pretty standard finds in these places. Eventually, after what felt like a fair bit of walking, we found ourselves at the second gate. For some reason, the authorities had left this one open, probably due to the fact that the tunnel is inaccessible from this side. Whatever the reason, it gave us an easy exit from the tunnel, where we found ourselves on a narrow muddy trail surrounded by dense forest. Apparently, if you continue down the track for a while you eventually reach the present day railway line, but it’s quite difficult for anyone to access the tunnel from this side. We didn’t walk down the trail to find out if this is true mind, since we had a bottle of whisky to get started on back in Dunedin. 

      Explored with Nillskill. 
       

       
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    • By WildBoyz
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      “Here in Sheffield we have a proud sporting heritage and it is important that we build upon that to create the right environment in which the sportsmen and women of the future can train, develop and thrive… But it isn’t just about the elite, it is about every man, woman and child in our city being fitter, healthier and enjoying physical activity” (Isobel Bowler, cabinet member for culture, sport and leisure at Sheffield council).

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      After the original plans were abandoned, a plan to build a brand-new leisure centre was proposed. The new £7 million project was quickly accepted and construction of the facility began in 2015, up the road from the old site in High Green. The erection of the new leisure centre was said to have been one of the first leisure developments in Sheffield in over a decade. The Thorncliffe Recreation Centre is now open and most of the staff from Chapeltown Baths were said to have been moved over. Various reports suggest that the new pool is larger and has an extra lane, and that a new community has been established there. Although the new site does not have the same character, local residents generally seem happy with the new facility. 

      As for the former Chapeltown Baths site, it has remained abandoned since the beginning of 2016. No plans have been set in stone yet; however, it is rumoured that the building will be demolished to make way for affordable housing. In the meantime, like most abandoned sites, the building has experienced increasing incidents of vandalism in recent months as local goons have managed to get their hands on a few brushes, several tins of Wilko One Coat and a box of safety matches. Smoke at the site was reported in March 2017, coming from the basement, and this resulted in the fire service being called to attend the scene. It is reported that they and had to cut their way into the building to extinguish a small fire. Fortunately, in this instance there was very little damage. As things stand presently, SCAFF Security Alarms Ltd. claim they have sealed the premises and installed various security systems to prevent any further vandalism. 

      Our Version of Events

      With a couple of hours to kill before we hit some of Sheffield’s legendary pubs later that evening, we decided to pop across to Chapeltown and take a look at the old public swimming pool that had recently been brought to our attention. None of us have ever been to Chapeltown before and I can’t say we were expecting to discover anything amazing there, but one thing we did notice is that the townspeople aren’t doing themselves any favours in terms of attracting tourists to the area. For instance, there’s a large sign in the centre of the town that reads, ‘Fast trains to Sheffield and Barnsley’, implying that you should probably get going as soon as possible. However, we chose to ignore the advice and hang around for a little while instead. 

      Finding the old swimming pool wasn’t particularly difficult. We sort of stumbled across it before needing to consult Google Maps for guidance. After that, we lingered around the bus stop that’s positioned right outside for a while, trying to work out why the metal shutter that should have been covering the main entrance looked like someone had had a go at it with a tin opener. At first, we were convinced that some incredibly ambitious explorer had decided to break in that way, rather than simply peel off a board. But, as we discovered later on, it turns out it was the firefighters who’d hacked a hole in the shutter. Even so, there was no evidence that they’d managed to get into the building that way – unless they had the keys to the building – because the front door behind it was still locked up tight. Fortunately, though, the shutter wasn’t the only opening the fire service had created. It is thanks to those guys, then, and their arsenal of cutting tools that we managed to get inside. 

      Once inside the building, we didn’t have to worry about being spotted from the outside since all the windows at ground level had been boarded over. This made capturing images a bit easier because we could wave the torches around a bit. However, the downside to our visit was that we were a bit late getting to this one as the local goons have been inside and clearly they got a little bit overexcited. Hence why there’s a mountain of shit in the pool and broken glass everywhere. On the positive side, however, the fire damage was minimal, limited to a very small section of the basement area. In that sense, the rest of the building remains unscathed. 

      All in all, it took us around forty minutes to cover the building from the basement to the loft. Afterwards, we left feeling satisfied that something new in Sheffield had turned up, but even more delighted that we were heading straight for The Fat Cat for no fewer than eight pints of Kelham Island’s finest and a plate of homemade curry. Many hours later, after an innumerable number of pints, two curries and several packets of peanuts, we staggered back out onto the streets of Sheffield. We were tempted to have a quick look at Minitron while we were so close, but since the lampposts on the other side of the street were swaying in a very unusual manner, we decided to call it a day and head back into town for one final pint before bed. 

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