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Wevsky

Belgium Ghost bus tunnel Jan 2015

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As The_Raw asked me so nicely heres a report even tho i posted some in photo of the day

Wasn't going to do a report as to be honest after tails of PIR's being present we kinda expected when was triggered for loud alarms to go off,so we avoided the area. Baron kindly told us he set one off and we didn't go down as far as the old stairs leading up to a semi built station as there was a "chirping " noise which seemed to become more frequent as we got closer.Turns out if the pir does go off it just flashes so we could have cracked on,But after the effort getting in a joint decision was made to pack up and get back to the hotel and grab some sleep

This is an unfinished metro system started in the 70's i believe and is now the home to much old junk and many buses and old trams!

A few pics of what we did manage to cover..

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Explored with Obscurity,Extreme Ironing,The-Raw and Monkey..waited a while to have another crack at shis so even tho we didnt cover a huge distance or find the light switch i came away happy with my lot

Edited by Wevsky

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Nice one, good to have these things archived for the future mate, ya never know if it might get cleared out one day and never be seen like this again :thumb

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Nice one, good to have these things archived for the future mate, ya never know if it might get cleared out one day and never be seen like this again :thumb

Good point.i got a message last night showing some others in there with the lifhts on.thats just cheating

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Good point.i got a message last night showing some others in there with the lifhts on.thats just cheating

You wouldn't get to see the ghosts with the lights on though, defeats the whole point. You did see the ghosts right? :errr:

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You wouldn't get to see the ghosts with the lights on though, defeats the whole point. You did see the ghosts right? :errr:

Judging by the size of that shit at the entrance i dread to think what was lurking about in therr

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Brilliant Wevs, really would like to do this one, your arsenal of torches are working wonders!

only took my p7.2 for this one :)

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