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Fekneejit

Anyone West Yorks (Bradford/Keighley)?

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Morning :)

Post on Facebook this morning from a guy I follow, "The Walking Englishman", he gets bloody everywhere.

"One of the sad points during yesterdays walk in the Oxenhope and Haworth area was passing derelict mills. There were two large ones with windows all smashed, a sad case of neglect to beautiful buildings which will probably converted to dwellings. The first one was at Mytholmes and the second in Haworth which still had its impressive chimney standing. I hope they protect it."

No Mytholmes on Google Maps, but a pic of the Haworth one...

Clicky

Google Streetview's a pain in the arse on this laptop or I'd pin point it a bit better...

I'll go through his recent posts a bit better when I have a minute - he sometimes publishes his routes - & see if I can work out where the other is too.

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Are you near enough to go and have a peep? Might be worth a sniff if you are bud :thumb

I can't seem to get the little streetview man close enough :dunno:

Edited by hamtagger

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Ah, booooring, it's still got windows & everything :)

I don't have a car so Keighley's a bit out in the arse end of nowhere for me.

I'll be paying George Barnsley's a visit some time soon unless something else in Sheff catches my eye, like Hallam Towers as there's nothing from that place on here. I'd prefer to do Hallam Towers when it's a bit warmer though, a night time panorama from the roof of that place is a must.

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