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Partial solar eclipse - this Friday (20th March)

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Thought I'd mention it in case anyone wasn't aware, bonus points for any creepy window shots at an abandoned asylum during a partial eclipse surely? :D

07:41 - 11:50 UTC/GMT, 40-90% blocked from most of UK, 90%+ way oop north.

More info here.

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I'm historically dogshit and capturing any kind of sunlight coming through an asylum window, so i massively welcome the moon making it duller and easier for me to shoot this friday night lol :D

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Get a screen of some sort with pinholes in it & it'll project little crescents rather than spots. Could be quite nice anywhere as north as us...

If you're a decent photographer, so that's me ruled out then :grin2:

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I’ve had a perfect sky here in Germany, no clouds! :)

I've took the photos with aperture 40 and aperture priority mode (exposure time about 1/20 - 1/2000 second) with using a neutral density filter ND3.0 (x1000).

I've made exposure series, taken with tripod and remote shutter release. Lens: 300 mm (the photos are detail enlargements).

The maximum darkening of the sun on my point was 78%.



























Unfortunately the sun was to light, so you can’t see the darkening on the next two photos.





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