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mookster

USA Portside Grain Elevator aka 'The Motherload' - March 2015

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...or to give it it's proper title, the 'Holy f**king s**t this is epic' Grain Elevator.

After finding the most unassuming but amazing breakfast spot ever where I ate possibly the best toasted bacon and egg breakfast sandwich I have ever eaten I knew that it was going to be a good day.

This place is massive. And I mean truly MAHOOOOSIVE. The elevators at Silo City in Buffalo are the only things comparable in size to this behemoth which towers over everything in the neighbourhood. The ascent to the top floors where all the interest lies involves a dizzying, disorientating spiral staircase in a pitch black metal tube that takes you to the level above the vast silos, and then numerous staircases up to the roof - tiring stuff but the rewards are totally worth it. I soon forgot about my aching legs as once again I found myself somewhere in which I literally didn't know where to point the camera at first, everywhere I looked I saw something I needed to investigate.

So here are some photos of what I saw.

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Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157651177326707/

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Cheers peeps :)

Favourite thing I've seen from your recent trip this, full of win...any shots of the spiral staircase?

It wasn't that great from the outside, it went up about a floor then disappeared into the metal tube so not much to look at from top or bottom sadly...it was bloody tiring though!

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A little late to the party, I know... but have to say, Thanks For Posting! Motherlode indeed. I have been pondering the exploration of a couple of these locations in my backyard here in Indiana and find this collection a most powerful whetting agent!

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50 minutes ago, masodo said:

A little late to the party, I know... but have to say, Thanks For Posting! Motherlode indeed. I have been pondering the exploration of a couple of these locations in my backyard here in Indiana and find this collection a most powerful whetting agent!

 

Nothing wrong with bringing old reports back up to the surface, especially when they are like this!

 

@mookster you have a habit of producing epically mahoosive places, pretty synonymous with ‘murica I guess... 😉

 

nice one.

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