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LeeLewis82

Hello from East Anglia UK

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Hello all I'm lee from the UK carrot cruncher land known as East Anglia, been urbexing for a year and I'm addicted! There's not many places that I won't go.. my fears are only heights and spiders, both of which i switch off to and get on with it.

I'll upload some pics soon, peace out :thumb

Edited by hamtagger

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  • Similar Content

    • By The_Raw
      The Visit
      This was a great day out with Sentinel, filled with comedy moments, aggressive pigeons, a police helicopter, and a location which was far better than expected. Thanks to sentinel for always being up for a laugh in any given situation, lending me his wide angle lens on the odd occasion, and Gabe for putting this on the radar in the first place, I was blissfully unaware of it until our conversation.
      Access seemed a little too good to be true as we hopped into the site unseen and strolled straight through a wide open door. Unfortunately shortly afterwards we heard the door being locked behind us by security. This left a big question mark hanging over our exit strategy for the next two hours although there was something quite comical about being locked inside a psychiatric unit so we didn't stress about it too much. We ended up spending five hours in here, lots to see all over the place and we didn't even make it into a couple of the buildings including the very front one. We found several items of interest dotted around the place but definitely the strangest was a torture chair lurking in the basement complete with arm and leg straps and bandages with blood stains. There was also a small hole in the ceiling allowing the tiniest drops of water to fall onto the chair. We have a couple of theories about the origin of the chair but I'll let you draw your own conclusions, it was quite a freaky find regardless. Another strange find was evidence of someone having developed their own photos inside the building, I don't have the answers to that I'm afraid.
      Finally a big thank you to the Metropolitan police for accompanying our entire visit with the sound of a police helicopter hovering above (pictured in the first photo), thankfully they had far better things to search for than us but we did wonder at times.
       
      The History (stolen from Gabe's 2012 report)
      The building opened in 1849 as the City of London Union Workhouse. In 1874 it was converted into an infirmary for the same Union. Mental patients came here for examination and assessment before being sent to other institutions or being discharged. In 1902 it had 511 beds. When the Homerton Workhouse reopened in 1909, the infirmary became superfluous and was closed. However, it reopened in 1912 as the City of London Institution to treat the chronically ill. It was later renamed the Bow Institution.
      The LCC took over administration in 1930, when all the Boards of Guardians were abolished. In 1933 the number of beds in the Institution was increased to 786 and a mental observation unit established. In 1935 fire destroyed the west wing and the main building. In 1936 the Institution was renamed St Clement's Hospital.
      During WW2, when it had 397 beds, the hospital was badly damaged by bombs in 1944. In 1948 it joined the NHS and the bomb damage was repaired. By 1959 the Hospital had become exclusively psychiatric. It became part of the London Hospital Group in 1968 and was then called the London Hospital (St Clement's). In 1974, after another NHS upheaval, it became part of the Tower Hamlets Health District, when it had 146 beds. By 1979 it had 135 beds. In 2003 the East London and The City Mental Health NHS Trust decided to sell the site for redevelopment. The Hospital closed in 2005, with clinical services moving to a new purpose-built adult mental health facility at Mile End Hospital.
       
      The Pics:

       

       

       

       

       


       

       

       

       
      Found this book open on this page I kid you not!

       

       

       

       
      Some kind of makeshift dark room....

       

       
      The Chair

       

       
      View from the clock tower

       
      Worse photos can be found here https://www.flickr.com/photos/74870643@N02/sets/72157643376912974/
      Thanks for looking
    • By TheVampiricSquid


      Hey guys..
      Little late with the report but headed down to Jameah with SlimJim and Chopper. We found ourselves an open door and had a little mooch around. After hearing what we presumed was secca talking, we backtracked and headed over to the church, after snapping away here we headed round into the main building. We dind't get very far as we heard muffled voices and signs of life - the smell of fresh cooking, clothes hanging out to dry etc.. from here we decided to back up once again and make our way out.. on our exit we bumped into a gentleman, who informed us that it's in fact not derelict, and is still teaching as a school!
      The short story with this place is that it was originally a Victorian orphanage. In later years it became a seminary and also ballet school and ultimately became an Islamic school. It's infamy came about when in the late 90s, Abu Hamza used it to train his acolytes in the use of automatic weaponry and handguns. Further dodgy goings on were reported later on and the Police raided the place in 2006. (Borrowed from Jim:D)












      Unfortunately I did't take any externals as the guy we asked said no, so we respected his requests and went on our way. Shame though, as it is such a beautiful building.
      Thanks for reading guys!

    • By sentinel
      Visit
      This was a great little explore with The_Raw.
      On the first visit some funny random things straight from the start, including being locked in by security, finding some strange torture chair, both being attacked by pigeons plus some others.
      On the second visit I noticed a couple of Squibb Demolition cabins had been placed onsite so looks like works may be starting shortly.
      History
      The building opened in 1849 as the City of London Union Workhouse. In 1874 it was converted into an infirmary for the same Union. Mental patients came here for examination and assessment before being sent to other institutions or being discharged. In 1902 it had 511 beds. When the Homerton Workhouse reopened in 1909, the infirmary became superfluous and was closed. However, it reopened in 1912 as the City of London Institution to treat the chronically ill. It was later renamed the Bow Institution.
      The LCC took over administration in 1930, when all the Boards of Guardians were abolished. In 1933 the number of beds in the Institution was increased to 786 and a mental observation unit established. In 1935 fire destroyed the west wing and the main building. In 1936 the Institution was renamed St Clement's Hospital.
      During WW2, when it had 397 beds, the hospital was badly damaged by bombs in 1944. In 1948 it joined the NHS and the bomb damage was repaired. By 1959 the Hospital had become exclusively psychiatric. It became part of the London Hospital Group in 1968 and was then called the London Hospital (St Clement's). In 1974, after another NHS upheaval, it became part of the Tower Hamlets Health District, when it had 146 beds. By 1979 it had 135 beds. In 2003 the East London and The City Mental Health NHS Trust decided to sell the site for redevelopment. The Hospital closed in 2005, with clinical services moving to a new purpose-built adult mental health facility at Mile End Hospital.












    • By superwide
      November 2013
      This was a quick visit with little time available, which was handy as the place is tiny.
      All that I have managed to find out about this place is that it was a reservoir built to service the East Ashford Union Workhouse.
      In 1837, the East Ashford Union erected a workhouse on the west side of Kennington Road in Ashford. It was designed to accommodate 350 inmates and the architect was John Whichcord of Maidstone whose plan was based on Sir Francis Head's model courtyard design.
      Sorry about the picture quality.

      Ash res by dualster, on Flickr

      Ash res (2) by dualster, on Flickr

      Ash res (1) by dualster, on Flickr


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