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Czech Republic A German ghost church in the Czech Republic

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Got the coordinates for this place.

Its an old church closed since the early 60's, due to communism I believe.

A local artist has made all these ghost that represent Germans praying before the war.

Its is one of the more remote locations I have gone to, the roads to the village were just rough tracks.

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17164169172_3ff621ba22_z.jpg_COZ8854 by

17164169192_2aef6de66f_z.jpg_COZ8777

16979627129_12c0169d29_z.jpgDSC_6991

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      The tower stairs

       
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      Thanks for looking!
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