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London underground permission visits.

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If any are interested I saw this pop up on my news feed.

Organised by The London Transport Museum.

Charing Cross

That tour will take you through parts of Charing Cross that were closed in 1999 stretching underneath Trafalgar Square.

The tunnels are now used largely for filming movies and TV shows, with Daniel Craig chasing Javier Bardem around an area slyly disguised as Temple Station in Skyfall.

The recent Paddington film was shot there too.

Tours take place in June and July with tickets released on 17 April at £25 (£20 concessions).

The second tour in Clapham South is even more exciting, as it includes a visit to the deep level shelter next to the main tunnels which was used in the Second World War during air raids.

This one represents an extremely rare opportunity to get to parts of the Underground not normally open to the public. Tours take place in October with tickets released on 17 April at £30 (£25 concessions).

See more here.


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Good stuff, sounds interesting :thumb

Would be cool to accidentally veer off the tour route whilst down there :)

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Sold out, i snoozed, #$*/*/ #*$*/* gutted, i would risk the hard way if anyone needs a hand ;) unless you want to sell me your ticket!

Edited by MrT

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i would risk the hard way if anyone needs a hand ;)

I would advise getting a friend/job at the North Face store in Covent Garden ;)

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