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Short walk around Monckton Coke and Chemical Co - 2015

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That's cool mate, I need to get this one ticked off :)

Security very on the ball at the moment, got chucked out very quickly from here last weekend.

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Security very on the ball at the moment, got chucked out very quickly from here last weekend.

That makes two of us then mate lol, I was perched on top of a fence at the back of the site last weekend and encountered some shouty workers so legged it down the railway :o

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To be fair the security guy was very nice and polite, a local lad from the town so we had a good chat about stuff before leaving - he's fully aware of the urbex forums and looks at them pretty regularly. Security is stationed on site 24/7 in one of the buildings near the front gate and all the cameras around the site are monitored from inside there.

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To be honest mooks it was a couple of workers that spotted me at the worst possible moment, didn't get a chance to meet the secca, maybe next time :D

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  • Similar Content

    • By Lavino
      visited the croda chemical plant myself @woopashoopaa @telf @the Kwan and thanks to Kwan for giving us the tour of this huge site. Covered the whole site apart from the one with the clock tower and it did look rather good. We had heard that security patrolled the site on a motorbike we did here one but never saw one. But we did see the metal fairies who were so busy they ran past us in one room and didn't even see us lol. So here's some history and some of my photos...
      THE HISTORY
      Croda was originally owned by Price's Patent Candle Company. In 1853, Palm oil was brought into Liverpool and so the company needed a site to use the palm oil closer to Liverpool than taking it to London by boat. The company build what is now Bromborough Pool village and opened a new factory in Bromborough. The factory opened in 1855 and the company went from having 84 staff in 1840 to a remarkable 2300.
      In 1919 the company was taken over by Lever Brothers who used the site for soap production. There is no longer any evidence of either of these companies having used the site. In 1936 the Lever Brothers pulled out of candle production but continued to use the site until 1997 when ICI bought it off Unilever (Unichema on-site), formerly Lever Brothers/Margarine Union.
      Since then it has been known as Croda International and continued production of fatty acids and glycerol until late 2009 when the site ceased production. The site is still very much live, but is in the process of being decommissioned and demolished, which has resulted in the loss of 115 jobs mainly held by people living in Bromborough Pool village.








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    • By WildBoyz
      History

      The building this report is based on is the old art deco Filter House. The building housed all of the equipment and tanks that were needed to complete the chemical filtration process. It also contained a laboratory which was used to handle chemicals and conduct tests, to ensure the water was fit for human consumption before being sent to the nearby reservoir. 

      The site on which the old chemical filter building at Sandford Mill sits began life as a corn mill. The timber mill was constructed sometime in the early 19th century, directly over a stream that would run underneath the centre of the building. The stream drove a large water wheel, which provided power to the corn mill. By the end of the century, a steam engine was installed to generate additional power. It is noted that coal used to run the engine was supplied from Newcastle-under-Lyme, which was transported along canals via horse drawn barges. 

      In 1923 Chelmsford Corporation purchased the site for the construction of a new Borough Waterworks. Construction of the new facility began in 1926, around the time milling in the area ceased. The old corn mill was subsequently demolished, save for two cottages which were built in 1905. They are the only surviving remnants of the original mill. The waterworks started operating in March 1929, despite the fact that it was not fully completed until July 1930. The preliminary site consisted of a large red brick building which became known as the ‘Engine House’. Water from the River Chelmer, and from a 650ft deep borehole was both treated and pumped inside this building using electrically-driven pumps. These were powered by diesel driven alternators during the day and the mains electricity supply by night. 

      The capacity of the waterworks was improved in 1956, following the construction of a new building that was known as the ‘Filter House’. The entire water treatment process was transferred over to the new building, and additional pumps were installed in the Engine House. Three further pump houses were also erected across the site, to move the water around the site through the various stages of the treatment process. The largest pump house, positioned over by the weir, became known as the River Pump House. After being treated the water was transported via the Engine House over to Galleywood Reservoir, approximately four miles away, for use in Chelmsford. Although local rumour has it that the building was designed and constructed by the same Scottish architects, Dunn and Watson, who are responsible for the construction of the Marconi factory in Chelmsford, this is in fact not true. Dunn and Watson’s practice closed in 1912, forty-four years before the chemical building was completed. While the Filter House follows a very similar late art deco design, whoever constructed it remains unknown. 

      During the mid-70s, the water industry was nationalised and the site was acquired by the Essex Water Company. To avoid the operating two duplicated sites in close proximity of one another, the water company decided to transfer all operations to a site further down the River Chelmer, at Langford. By 1984, all water pumping at the Sandford Mill site ceased and the facility was made completely redundant. Most of the equipment was removed that same year, and the land was returned to the Borough Council. 

      Our Version of Events

      At the end of areasonably successfulday of exploring over in Colchester, where we’d ended up finding ourselves in a semi-abandoned hospital, we decided to meet up with Xploring and DRZ_Explorer. For the rest of the evening we fucked around trying to get into a cinema, then in the clock tower of the Britvic site and finally, rather randomly, a cemetery. After that, we arranged to meet up the next night because there was some sort of chemical filter building nearby that sounded like it was a good wander. From what we were being told, the place sounded like it was something a bit different and unique. 

      The following evening came, and we all met up down a small country lane by the side of a canal. Getting onto the site wasn’t particularly difficult; although, finding a way inside the building itself presented its own set of challenges. However, it wasn’t long before we were all inside the building, gathered at the bottom of the main staircase that leads into the main tank room. It was at this point we realised visiting during the night perhaps wasn’t the greatest idea ever conceived. Once we climbed the stairs and entered the large hall housing the chemical tanks it suddenly dawned on us that the room is has windows on every side, and overlooking the building are the former mill cottages and the museum – where there were lights switched on. We did our best to take photos throughout the building, but not being able to light-paint too well meant that most of the shots came out a bit shit. In the end, we gave up and decided we’d pop back the following day, during daylight hours.

      We returned the next day, and were disappointed to find a white van parked outside. So, for the next hour or so we had to play the waiting game and a couple of rounds of dominos, until the van and its occupants finally fucked off. Thankfully, they did eventually leave, so we made our way back to the entrance we’d found the previous night. Fortunately, it was still open. Once inside, visibility was incredible. Plenty of natural light was pouring through the windows, making our job of snapping up some photos much easier. What is more, now we could properly take in our surroundings. The lads from the previous night had been right, the place looked amazing. With all of the tiles around, it was kind of like standing in an ancient swimming baths, crossed with an old-school batman-styled chemical factory – the type where bad-guys and scientists have a high risk of falling into a vat of unspecified chemical waste. 

      Much to our disappointment, neither batman nor the joker turned up. The only weird thing we stumbled across were a few skeletons of rabbits and squirrels. As others have said before, it looked like a small-scale massacre had taken place. Our theory, then, is that the animals had somehow managed to get inside the building, because, as with all explores, it has been broken into a few times. This means at some point the doors and windows may have been open to the little critters. Since all the skeletons look fairly intact, it looked more like the animals died due to poisoning – they are inside a former chemical filtering building after all, where there is an abundance of chemical residue. How they all managed to end up in the same room, however, is a harder phenomenon to explain. Our guess is that Poison Ivy may have inhabited the building at some point, and she moved all the corpses into that room where she was able to have a bit of a barbeque. We found her cans of special brew; evidence that she definitely cooked something up in that room. Anyway, we’re certain that this theory surpasses all others in terms of its validity and reliability. 

      Explored with Ford Mayhem, Slayaaaa, Stewie and Xploring.  
       
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    • By Merryprankster
      way over due writing an actual report, got a back log of about 20 reports at the minute but just cant find the time or the internet speed for uploading to flickr, spend most the week working away on the most basic hotel wifi youve ever seen then when the weekend comes around im always off exploring, anwyays heres a little start with some good old south wales indursty

      took my mate lara whos wanted to come exploring for a while, was a good day but i reckon we only saw about 2/3rds as we had other stuff on the list to tick off, definitely want to come back here in the summer when the foliage is in full bloom

      bit of coffee and paste histoire

      Cwm coke works is a large site just north of Beddau in Rhondda Cynon Taf. Up until the mid 1800′s Beddau was a small collection of farmsteads at the conjunction of four crossroads. (Incidentally, Beddau, which means ‘graves’, may be a shortening of Croesheol y Beddau, ‘crossroads of the graves’, as it is marked on an ordnance survey map circa. 1833. Criminals were often hanged as crossroads as an example to others…). In the 1860′s coal pits were sunk around Beddau, and the town grew at a steady rate until 1909, which saw the opening of Cwm colliery. As the industry moved in, Beddau grew quickly, and in 1958 Cwm coke works opened, furthering the expansion. At its peak, Cwm colliery was producing hundreds of thousand of tons of high quality, low sulphur coal per year. Much of this was processed at Cwm coke works, into high-grade coke suitable for foundry use. The National Coal Board closed the colliery in 1986, and Cwm Coke works in 2002, leaving yet another small Welsh town deprived and forgotten. It would seem now, work has begun to reclaim the land, so perhaps this magnificent example of commanding industry and stark, utilitarian achitecture won’t be around for much longer.












































      thanks kids ttake it sleazy!!
    • By Funlester
      This was the second stop of out Sunday trip.
      I have to say I do love a good bit of industrial filth.
      History -
      Originally owned by Price's Patent Candle Company. In 1853, Palm oil was brought into Liverpool and so the company needed a site to use the palm oil closer to Liverpool than taking it to London by boat. The company build what is now Bromborough Pool village and opened a new factory in Bromborough. The site employed around 115 people and was part of the Uniqema acquisition in 2006.
      In 2008, the business had a turnover of £45.3m and made a £2.1m operating profit. This was flattered by favourable glycerine pricing and the site made a loss in the final quarter of 2008 which has worsened into 2009, this poor performance eventually lead to the closure of the site.



























    • By macc_explore
      The Explore
      After visiting Lostock power station this was actually a really relaxed explore with lots of different types of building to look around, theres warehouses, offices, workshops and a huge industrial area at the back.
      The History
      Originally owned by Price's Patent Candle Company. In 1853, Palm oil was brought into Liverpool and so the company needed a site to use the palm oil closer to Liverpool than taking it to London by boat. The company build what is now Bromborough Pool village and opened a new factory in Bromborough. The site employed around 115 people and was part of the Uniqema acquisition in 2006.
      In 2008, the business had a turnover of £45.3m and made a £2.1m operating profit. This was flattered by favourable glycerine pricing and the site made a loss in the final quarter of 2008 which has worsened into 2009, this poor performance eventually lead to the closure of the site.












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