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Selly Oak Hospital & Mortuary May '15

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After what seems like forever without an explore (in reality it's only been 3 weeks) I finally got let loose on the abandonments again!

By 9.30am myself and OverArch had racked up a trio of fails in quick succession so it looked to all intents and purposes like today was heading down the toilet. Heading to Selly Oaks was rather glum, it was grey and raining and not very nice but after some dumb luck and bumping into a trio of other explorers the five of us located an access point which proved utterly undignified for nearly all of us, especially me as per usual. We went our separate ways once inside and only bumped into each other a couple more times, the place is huge and keeps going on and on and on. If you guys (and girl) are reading this, thanks for the company :)

And the extra special icing on the cake was managing to get into the mortuary, after spotting a pair of other explorers attempting to access it we realised what we had to do to get in, to say it's slightly sketchy is an understatement but all five of us were in after a bit of lateral thinking and more dumb luck. Definitely the nicest mortuary I've seen and with some lovely decayed laboratories on the upper floor as well.

Over four hours later we made it back to the car, pleased that the day hadn't been a total appalling failure.

It's been a while since I explored any site of this size let alone a hospital of this size and despite it's largely modernised appearance I rather enjoyed it.

























Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157653758432252 :D

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Banging set of shot there mate, nice high angle on one of those mortuary shots i liked too. :thumb

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This is great, I noticed that the pillow has now no longer there in the chapel or rest? Or can I just not see it?

Pics are great, at least the day ended well :D


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Great set. We were there Saturday and bar the canteen area, weve got completely different shots to yours haha. Its HUGE!! and we couldnt get in the Morgue either so whether theyve sealed it im not sure? Great set mind.

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This is great, I noticed that the pillow has now no longer there in the chapel or rest? Or can I just not see it?

Pics are great, at least the day ended well :D


Pillow is still there, it was on the windowsill of that viewing window in the chapel :)

Great set. We were there Saturday and bar the canteen area, weve got completely different shots to yours haha. Its HUGE!! and we couldnt get in the Morgue either so whether theyve sealed it im not sure? Great set mind.

Mortuary isn't sealed it just is an absolute bitch/pain in the arse to get into, not easy at all.

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      7 : East Side

      8 : Some more of the East side

      9 : The external of the curved corridor

      10 :

      11 :

      The Internals
      12 :

      13 :

      14 :

      15 :

      16 :

      17 : The corridor Kink

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      20 : The corridor which led you to the Mortuary & Tower, sadly closed off

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      Thanks for looking!