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St Joseph's seminary gaurdians

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    • By TheBaronof Scotland
      Visited with Makepondsnotwar and Venustas, nice 6.00am start at Macdonalds where I was given free coffee from the girl there (no idea why lol)
      What a fantastic location this is, for me it’s the best place in the UK I`ve done.
      Loads of history on DugieUK`s report the other week and I`m not one for words so I`ll crack on with the pictures
      I make no apologies for the number of pics, 6 hours and we didn’t cover it all, just so bloody big !!






      We found what looks like a room that used to house coin collections. Fascinating room, looks like details of each coin was held on a slip of paper underneath each part that holds the coin









      The Red Room



      Thought this was really cool

      Ok, kind of went a bit OCD with this sowing machine, but I like it 




      Ok, so back to moving around the building again, so much to see





    • By Lavino
      Visited this wonderful place many time and it never fails me. Been with diffrent people who I've arranged to to from various urbex sites not forgetting woopashoopaa and also come across many others in there so you no who you are and nice to meet you guys.. Let's say the entrance isn't the easiest I've done but I like a challenge whe all the hype St joes gets with all its alarms and cameras and secca it's not a bad thing as it keeps out the vandals and the like. And the alarms aren't the kindest on the eardrums I call it the sonic attack. Anyways here's a few photos and a bit of history ...
      HistorySt Joseph’s Seminary at Upholland opened in 1883, the first phase was built to a design by James O’Bryne. Set amongst a backdrop of copse and wildwood amidst gently sloping fields, the buildings are flanked with rough-hewn stone. An upper and lower lake are separated by a gentle and soothing waterfall. 1 The 150 acres of land the seminary is built upon had been purchased at auction in 1877. The grandeur of the chapels, meeting rooms, fixtures and fittings was unbelievable.The seminary was closed during WW1 and reopened in 1919 along with a junior seminary. The second phase of construction commenced in 1923. The design was in a different style to the original buildings, however it was equally as grand. Landscaped gardens and sports facilities were also completed by 1927. A new chapel was added in 1930 along with 14 sub chapels. The final addition to the site was a science block. 2St Joseph’s, usually referred to by its students simply as Upholland, was the main seminary serving the North West of England. The sister seminary at Ushaw provided the same services for the North East. Both institutions housed both a junior and senior seminary. The junior seminaries provided secondary education in a semi-monastic environment to boys aged 11 to 18 who wished to pursue the priesthood. The senior seminary taught adults philosophy and theology as they prepared for priesthood.






















    • By Lavino
      visited st josephs myself woopashoopaa and gronk this was our first stop of the day after we gained access we found it was now being inhabited by pidgeons and there was shit everywhere. the church and been pretty much stripped but was still worth a look. as the place hasnt been covered that much.just as we had left and crossed the road taking our externals the police turned up so made our escape to our next place so heres bit of history i found and a few pictures
      In October 1870, Father Henry J Lamon (see "St. Joseph's Clergy") was appointed head of the new mission that would soon become the Parish of St. Joseph, Wigan, and it was due to the untiring zeal and great energy of the new Rector that rapid progress was made.
      The first service was held on 22nd January, 1871, in a small chapel that formerly belonged to the Primitive Methodist Body, in Caroline Street, but in a very short time the building was found to be too small for the increasing numbers of Catholics living in the surrounding Wallgate area.
      Consequently, with the permission of the Right Reverend Doctor O'Reilly, Bishop of Liverpool, Father Lamon purchased some adjoining land to the chapel, at a cost of £500. The old Methodist chapel was then pulled down, and on the site was erected the first church of St. Joseph, which opened in April 1872. This new church was built to accommodate between 500 and 600 worshippers at a cost of £3,000 - a considerable sum at the time.
      At a further cost of £5,000, through the support of his faithful parishioners, by 1874, Father Lamon had built the schools at St. Joseph's, which soon had an average attendance of over 800 scholars!
      However, it soon became evident that the new church was totally inadequate for the requirements of the district, and steps were taken without delay for the erection of a more extensive building.
      NOTE: During his time at St. Joseph's, there was frequent correspondence between Father Lamon and the Bishop of Liverpool, regarding the possible acquisition of land around Caroline Street. Indeed, some of Father Lamon's letters to the Bishop, which are kept in the Archdiocesan Archives, suggest that the first Rector of St. Joseph's was most shrewd and business-like when dealing in such matters
      In due course, more land adjacent to the church was purchased, and the old premises were removed to make room for the building of a second new church!
      The design of the new St. Joseph's Church, the one that so many came to know and love, was entrusted to Mr. Goldie, of the firm of Messrs. Goldie and Child, of Kensington, London, and the contract, which amounted to about £6,000, to Mr. J. Wilson, of Wigan, with Mr. Weatherby acting as clerk of works. In 1877, the foundation stone was laid and blessed by the Right Rev. Dr. O'Reilly, and, together, with the adjoining Presbytery for the accommodation of three priests, the church was completed in 1878 and opened on Sunday, 30th June of that year.







      P



    • By jones-y-gog
      It's about time I submitted something from my growing backlog so here's one from a little while back...
       
      The Roman Catholic theological college was founded in 1808 and finally closed in 2011.
       
      I made 2 visits within the space of 10 days, due to forgetting to attach the tripod plate onto the base of my camera the first time. Lesson learned!
       
      For fans of uber-decay and religious icons this is a treat 
       
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      And on to the St Cuthbert's chapel. I was a bit gutted that the pews had very recently been tampered with in a serious way, however there was plenty of wonderful stuff to appreciate.
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      I have to say I was totally mesmerised with this statue and ended up taking shots from every angle. To sum up the idea of beauty in decay in one shot, personally I think this would nail it -
       

       
       
      Peace be upon you brothers and sisters....
       
       
       
    • By macc_explore
      The Visits
      I'm sure this forum is awash with St. Joes reports but I thought as I'm new it would be rude of me not to post a few shots from my explores of this wonderful building. They are from a number of different visits ranging from June to October this year. Most have been very early morning visits hence the sunrise shots, personally I think this is the nicest time to enjoy this building. There are a good few generic shots everyone has seen before but I just love the place so couldn't help myself
      The History
      St Joseph’s Seminary at Upholland opened in 1883, the first phase was built to a design by James O’Bryne. Set amongst a backdrop of copse and wildwood amidst gently sloping fields, the buildings are flanked with rough-hewn stone. An upper and lower lake are separated by a gentle and soothing waterfall. The 150 acres of land the seminary is built upon had been purchased at auction in 1877. The grandeur of the chapels, meeting rooms, fixtures and fittings was unbelievable.
      The seminary was closed during WW1 and reopened in 1919 along with a junior seminary. The second phase of construction commenced in 1923. The design was in a different style to the original buildings, however it was equally as grand. Landscaped gardens and sports facilities were also completed by 1927. A new chapel was added in 1930 along with 14 sub chapels. The final addition to the site was a science block.




















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