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St Joseph's seminary gaurdians

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    • By BritishRanger
      I wont bore you with too much history, this place has been done before, and has been done better than my attempt. I just want to share some of my stuff, and hopefully get to know some people on the forum as I am pretty new to urbex.
       
      HISTORY:
       
      St Joseph's College, Upholland is a former Roman Catholic seminary in Upholland, Lancashire, England. The foundation of the large building was laid in April 1880 and college was opened in 1883. The buildings have recently been deconsecrated.
       
      In 1986 the total number of students was down to 82, of whom only 54 were Church students, and it was no longer viable to educate them on the premises. From 1987 the remaining students attended St John Rigby College in nearby Orrell for their schooling, an arrangement that continued until the very last of these students left Upholland in 1992.
       
      My Version =
       
      I was planning on visiting Crank Caverns with a few friends to start our exploring adventures with an easy location, but on route, I found the College.  We parked quite a bit away from the main road into the spot, so I dont even know what that side looks like, but I will be returning.  We approached through the woods, down a public footpath and arrived at the amazing building.  We spent around 15 minutes taking a few snaps, looking at possible entrance points, but by the time we made it around to the cemetary, a friendly security guard came around and informed us that we were trespassing and had to leave. We had a bit of a chat with the friendly bloke before heading off on our way with a bit more information.
       
      My friends and I also run a facebook page where we post all of our outdoorsy stuff, bikes, urbex, 4x4ing, anything really. https://www.facebook.com/0151outdoors/
       
      Anyway, heres some pictures, if anyone here can shed some light on approaching this place with more chance of success, give me a message please.
       





















































































       
       
    • By Nelly
      Joseph Rank House is the tallest building in Harlow at a height of 151 ft (46m)
      Once a headquarters for Rank, Hovis Mc Dougal (The bread makers) it is under now construction to turn it into 132 flats
      This was my first ever roof and I chose the windiest night of the year so far to visit, the guy on the weather just said that gusts of 85 m.p.h. have been measured, and it felt like it up there!!!

















      Thanks for taking the time
    • By TheBaronof Scotland
      Visited with Makepondsnotwar and Venustas, nice 6.00am start at Macdonalds where I was given free coffee from the girl there (no idea why lol)
      What a fantastic location this is, for me it’s the best place in the UK I`ve done.
      Loads of history on DugieUK`s report the other week and I`m not one for words so I`ll crack on with the pictures
      I make no apologies for the number of pics, 6 hours and we didn’t cover it all, just so bloody big !!






      We found what looks like a room that used to house coin collections. Fascinating room, looks like details of each coin was held on a slip of paper underneath each part that holds the coin









      The Red Room



      Thought this was really cool

      Ok, kind of went a bit OCD with this sowing machine, but I like it 




      Ok, so back to moving around the building again, so much to see





    • By Lavino
      Visited this wonderful place many time and it never fails me. Been with diffrent people who I've arranged to to from various urbex sites not forgetting woopashoopaa and also come across many others in there so you no who you are and nice to meet you guys.. Let's say the entrance isn't the easiest I've done but I like a challenge whe all the hype St joes gets with all its alarms and cameras and secca it's not a bad thing as it keeps out the vandals and the like. And the alarms aren't the kindest on the eardrums I call it the sonic attack. Anyways here's a few photos and a bit of history ...
      HistorySt Joseph’s Seminary at Upholland opened in 1883, the first phase was built to a design by James O’Bryne. Set amongst a backdrop of copse and wildwood amidst gently sloping fields, the buildings are flanked with rough-hewn stone. An upper and lower lake are separated by a gentle and soothing waterfall. 1 The 150 acres of land the seminary is built upon had been purchased at auction in 1877. The grandeur of the chapels, meeting rooms, fixtures and fittings was unbelievable.The seminary was closed during WW1 and reopened in 1919 along with a junior seminary. The second phase of construction commenced in 1923. The design was in a different style to the original buildings, however it was equally as grand. Landscaped gardens and sports facilities were also completed by 1927. A new chapel was added in 1930 along with 14 sub chapels. The final addition to the site was a science block. 2St Joseph’s, usually referred to by its students simply as Upholland, was the main seminary serving the North West of England. The sister seminary at Ushaw provided the same services for the North East. Both institutions housed both a junior and senior seminary. The junior seminaries provided secondary education in a semi-monastic environment to boys aged 11 to 18 who wished to pursue the priesthood. The senior seminary taught adults philosophy and theology as they prepared for priesthood.






















    • By Lavino
      visited st josephs myself woopashoopaa and gronk this was our first stop of the day after we gained access we found it was now being inhabited by pidgeons and there was shit everywhere. the church and been pretty much stripped but was still worth a look. as the place hasnt been covered that much.just as we had left and crossed the road taking our externals the police turned up so made our escape to our next place so heres bit of history i found and a few pictures
      In October 1870, Father Henry J Lamon (see "St. Joseph's Clergy") was appointed head of the new mission that would soon become the Parish of St. Joseph, Wigan, and it was due to the untiring zeal and great energy of the new Rector that rapid progress was made.
      The first service was held on 22nd January, 1871, in a small chapel that formerly belonged to the Primitive Methodist Body, in Caroline Street, but in a very short time the building was found to be too small for the increasing numbers of Catholics living in the surrounding Wallgate area.
      Consequently, with the permission of the Right Reverend Doctor O'Reilly, Bishop of Liverpool, Father Lamon purchased some adjoining land to the chapel, at a cost of £500. The old Methodist chapel was then pulled down, and on the site was erected the first church of St. Joseph, which opened in April 1872. This new church was built to accommodate between 500 and 600 worshippers at a cost of £3,000 - a considerable sum at the time.
      At a further cost of £5,000, through the support of his faithful parishioners, by 1874, Father Lamon had built the schools at St. Joseph's, which soon had an average attendance of over 800 scholars!
      However, it soon became evident that the new church was totally inadequate for the requirements of the district, and steps were taken without delay for the erection of a more extensive building.
      NOTE: During his time at St. Joseph's, there was frequent correspondence between Father Lamon and the Bishop of Liverpool, regarding the possible acquisition of land around Caroline Street. Indeed, some of Father Lamon's letters to the Bishop, which are kept in the Archdiocesan Archives, suggest that the first Rector of St. Joseph's was most shrewd and business-like when dealing in such matters
      In due course, more land adjacent to the church was purchased, and the old premises were removed to make room for the building of a second new church!
      The design of the new St. Joseph's Church, the one that so many came to know and love, was entrusted to Mr. Goldie, of the firm of Messrs. Goldie and Child, of Kensington, London, and the contract, which amounted to about £6,000, to Mr. J. Wilson, of Wigan, with Mr. Weatherby acting as clerk of works. In 1877, the foundation stone was laid and blessed by the Right Rev. Dr. O'Reilly, and, together, with the adjoining Presbytery for the accommodation of three priests, the church was completed in 1878 and opened on Sunday, 30th June of that year.







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