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Crazy climbers Shenzhen centre China (660 metres high)

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Just interested what you lot think of people doing these crazy climbs. I must take some serious balls to to this no ropes or anything.

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Certainly not for me, but I guess it flats some people's boats. I just hope they don't slip, kill themselves and then the shutter comes down on things for the rest of us!

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Awesome to watch! I'd stop at the top of the building though, fuck going out on that crane!

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