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Hello again everyone!

We are production crew from Kiev (Ukraine).We make an urbex series called Insiders Project.

Not Long ago the second episode of our show came to life and we want to share it with you and hear your opinion!

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In this episode, we infiltrate the Arsenal factory in Kiev. The episode shows the great scope of Soviet production and the miserable ruins that it became. This time a lot of attention paid to the historical and artistic components.

Please Enjoy!

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Great to see you on the forum Dmitry and for sharing your video.

When you sent me it on facebook I was very impressed.

Its quality viewing and look forwards to more of your work.

Thank you my friend :thumb

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  • Similar Content

    • By Gromr123
      A piece of British WW2 History hidden under a hillside. HMS Forward, a maritime intelligence centre, was key to monitoring the English channel and and was heavily involved in D-Day. Although it's fallen into dereliction, attempts to restore and maintain it have been carried out by 'Friends of HMS Forward'.

      History
      HMS Forward was the Royal Naval HQ, setup up on the 20th of June 1940 in the Guinness Trust Holiday Home.
      It had responsibility for units along the south cost, including:
      HMS Marlborough - Eastbourne HMS Aggressive - Newhaven HMS New - Newaven HMS Vernon - Roedean HMS Lizard - Hove
         
      The tunnels of HMS Forward began life in March 1941 after an Admiralty direction that ordered channel ports to setup facilities to maintain naval plots and created the need to securely house equipment for plotting and communications. It was decided to built a network of tunnels into the a hillside of South Heighton for operations to take place from.
      HMS Forward was designed by Lt. Col. F.H.Foster, Commander of the Royal Engineers, and built by the 1st Tunneling Engineers Group and No 172 Tunneling Company. They were completed on the 14th of November 1941.
       
      At the time they were a state of the art facility and were kitted out for every eventuality. This including backup power generator and full air conditioning systems with gas filters. They had chemical toilets, sleeping cabins and a gallery. Although the toilet were for emergencies only and it was noted that he veterans who worked here didn't even have knowledge of these toilets.
       

       
      The labyrinth of tunnels had an East and West entrance. The West entrance by the main road was the main entrance. The East entrance was under the West wing of the Guinness Trust Holiday Home (now demolished).
       
      There were two Pill boxes at the top of the hill that were accessible from inside the tunnels, but were demolished long ago.
      During its operational period between November 1941 and August 1945, the tunnels of HMS Forward carried out many key maritime operations. It monitored the English channel from Dungeness to Selsy Bill using ten radar stations from Fairlight to Bogner Regis.
      It was heavily involved with D-Day as well as nightly raids on the occupied french coast.

      The Explore
      A very nice explore in a very nice set of tunnels. They are quite extensive and is quite the maze, however once you get your head round the layout its impossible to get lost.
      Its quite a shame that such an important piece of history has been left to rot. This is somewhere that really needs to be preserved for future generation. I'd heard that there was intention to turn it into a museum some time ago, but plans for this got scuppered by the local residents up top.
      It was clear that there was once some kind of open day as there were still laminated signs and notices left up by the 'Friends of HMS Forward'.

      Photos
      The West entrance with signs and notices from a previous open day / tour. Looks like it was a good few years ago though. You can see here what looks like a machine gun nest in the brick wall as you turn the very first corner.


       

       

      The large security gate of the West entrance.
       

       

      The long 100m West adit tunnel looking towards the east end.
       

       

      Looking from the East end of the West Adit. The two tunnels going left and right just before are the stairs up to the South and North Pill boxes.
       

       

      Looking up what remains of the stairs to the Northern Pillboxes. It is possible go up to the top of these, but its been sealed up at the top with rubble.
       

       

      The West Airlock.
       

       

       

      The Air conditioning plant room and standby generator room. The standby generator was a large diesel JP Lister engine. This provided 400V/230V power at 22Kw. Exhaust was piped through to the annex at the back of the engine room where it was exhausted through the ceiling too the surface through a 4" pipe.
       

       

       

      The start of the operational rooms of the tunnel. The room on the left side is the TURCO Office, and looking right down the long tunnel is down the length of the main tunnel with sleeping cabins.
      T.U.R.C.O stands for Turn Round Control Organisation, used to 'Assist naval shore authorities in the quick turn around of ships and craft'.
       

       

      The East gallery was used for sleep accommodation, switchboards and coders. 
       

       

      The GPO Voice frequency equipment room. The pits in the floor are to fit the equipment in, as the modems were over 8ft tall. 
       

       

      Looking down the East Galley and into the Teleprinters room.
       

       

      Looking down the the far end of the plotting rooms. 
       

       

      The sleeping cabins. There were 4 of these for personnel on the night duty and split watches. 
       

       

      Looking up towards the mock hen house, sealed at the top of course.
       

       

       

       

      The stairs up to the eastern entrance with pit at the bottom to slow down would-be invaders. 
       

       

      The gate on the way to the East entrance.
       

       

       

      The remains of a second gate.
       


      Thanks for reading!
    • By The_Raw
      This extravagant castle was originally built in 1605 to a more simple design. During the 19th century it underwent an Arabian style makeover which took 40 years to reach completion. No attention was spared to detail, with each and every one of the 365 rooms given its own identity. During the second world war it was looted by the Germans. After that it became a luxury hotel until it closed it's doors in 1990. Since then various plans have fallen through and a very recent sale attempt was upheld by Italian courts so its future remains unknown. 
       
      I visited here with @Miss.Anthrope, a place we'd both had firmly at the top of our wish lists for some time. We could've spent hours in here but decided to air on the side of caution and keep our visit relatively short as we'd been asked to leave the area by security the day before. I guess it was pretty obvious what we were up to with camera bags and tripods peeking over the fence and we'd been spotted on cctv. On our return we made sure not to make the same mistake as they are definitely keeping an eye on the place. Derelict buildings don't come much more stunning than this. 
       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
      Ciao bella
    • By The_Raw
      Villa Sbertoli was built in the early 1800s by wealthy merchant Agostino Sbertoli. According to some sources he decided to turn the villa into a psychiatric hospital because he had a disabled son, whom he tried to cure all his life. On his death bed he decided to devote all his possessions to a charity for the mentally ill, even their, so that his son could feel at home. It was inaugurated as a psychiatric hospital in 1868.

      During World War II it was used by the Nazis to hold prisoners but afterwards was sold to the province and used as a psychiatric hospital again. In 1978 "Law Basaglia" (a reform of the Italian psychiatric system) was passed and the hospital was forced to close. By 1990 it was abandoned completely. 
       
      Really liked it in here, the main hall is stunning and there are a few medical rooms upstairs. Perhaps a bit staged in one or two of them but interesting all the same. The building next door had some nice bits as well. Unfortunately we got off to a bad start by bumping into Jonny the security guard. He seemed like a really nice guy but it was difficult to communicate with him. Luckily @Miss.Anthropewas on hand with her mystical ability to understand everything a foreigner says in a language she doesn't speak. He wanted 20 Euros off each of us to let us inside, and that's why he was being so nice. Now I'm not really into paying for explores so we told him we had no money on us. He didn't like this predicament much so we eventually reached a settlement of 5 Euros for the both of us. A sum we could happily live with! 
       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
      Nice one bruvva
    • By radkooo
      hallo, this video is about abandoned swimming pool in Slovakia. It is my first (but not last - soon there will be more) so I hope you like it.
      Thank you.
       
       
    • By Thelocksmithman
      Well here goes a first report on here since i joined in 2013, completely forgetting i had created an account so please accept my delayed apologies for being inactive...
       
      I visited this place in 2014, so a while ago now... hence why the pictures are how they are . After an epic road trip up north, we returned to our hometown and had an opportunity for something we had been working on for a while. Exhausted from lack of sleep and driving many miles, we were not going to miss this window of opportunity and visited the place before it was no longer doable.
       
      Really not sure on the history of the place, possibly built as wine vaults? Unable to find any records of it to be honest, it was really a right place at the right time thing. I believe it was at some point used as a youth club, then left vacant for a number of years and last i heard it was a gym. Unsure of the current situation, would like a revisit with the new camera and glass but beggars cant be choosers eh!!
       
      Visited with non members JDY and xcon2icon. Access at the time was a walk in the park, and ive not seen it posted before so hoping its something that isn't the monotonous same old stuff for people to look at either, despite the lack of decent pictures!!
       
      Really not the most exciting evening, no security, no nosy neighbors, no drama!
       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       
      Thanks for looking!!
       
       
       
       
       


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