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The Analog Urbex [facebook group]

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In this age of hypercoated glass, super-ultrawides and space age image editing,

the merits and intrinsical beauty of oldskool analog photography is often easily overlooked.

Hence my new little facebook group: The Analog Urbex.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/AnalogUrbex/

100% Analog pictures of explorations and urbex related adventures.

With 3 exceptions:

- You can of course digitally scan your image, or photograph it digitally, as long as the base material is film.

When in serious doubt, users might be asked for a discernable pic of their negative. Editing is allowed

- Digital pictures of the gear you took your analog pictures with are acceptable

- Relevant comparisons stemming from deep philosophical discussions on the analog vs.digital subject, we can't say no to that can we!?

The group is off to quite a slow start, due to the fact that I can't actually seem to find more than a handful of people that still do the analog thing.

I just turned down the analog path myself with a Pentax ME that was obviously destined for exploration (In the sense that I found this beauty 'abandoned' at a recycling yard, in full working order, with a 135 Takumar lens as a bonus. The stuff people throw away these days!)

If you can't become a member on the group page itself (it's a closed group) drop me a message!

Come show off your analog works of art over at the The Analog Urbex!

And don't forget to join the cover photo contest!

(To ye mods, If you wish I'll link a group post back to oblivionstate.com as soon as we get some activity going!)

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DecayMasters, you definitely should!

Ever since i found this old pentax i've been lugging it to abandoned places just in case I see that special sth that would make for a great analog pic.

Shooting film is a very interesting experience, definitely takes more awareness and premeditation then just filling cards on digital.

The group is a little light on content for the moment, but i'm getting some rolls developed :)

more to come real soon!

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