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Stussy

UK Welsh Wool Mills, Wales - Dec 2014

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Still miles behind in posting some reports up, but this was from an small trip to Engerlandshire and Welsheepshugger land between Xmas and New Year. First stop of this particular cold morning was one of two mills I visited. The first is known as Tweed Mill, and access is not the easiest, but a bit of decent balance and no stopping half way over its simple enough for what is a bit of a gem of a little mill. Ever since I first saw this place appear on the forums a few years ago, I knew it was right up my street, lots of nice natural decay, and plenty of bits left behind to see!!

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The second mill, only a mile up the road, was jam packed with machines, making it a bit harder to get the images I wanted, but did my best, known as the Wool Mill.

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Many thanks for looking, as always, click the pics if you want to see more or visit my Flickr :thumb

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I visited these two last year and had to wade the river for that first one because the old woman who owned the land stopped me going the easy way..but it was worth catching the whooping cough what lasted ten months and kept me off work for a fortnight to see them..great set of pics there.

Edited by Mikeymutt

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