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TheVampiricSquid

George Barnsley & Sons, Sheffield - June 2015

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History:

founded in 1836 and specializing in manufacture files and cutting tools for use in the shoe making industry, they grew to become the world’s leading producer of tools for shoemakers. The technological revolution of the 20th century saw a decline in the need for traditional tools. George Barnsley & Sons survived until 2003 when the premises finally closed.

Explore:

This site was 2nd on the agenda for my day in Sheffield with Miz Firestorm, Duggie & Alex. Short walk from the courts and we were there, somewhat interesting entry (although i can't go into details ;)) and we were in! Had a nice, undisturbed wonder round here - stunning place I must add, really enjoyed it here. I'll upload the rest of the pictures from the day once I get round to editing, but until then, have these..:thumb

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As always, thanks for looking!

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    • By TheBaronof Scotland
      Next set from this amazing place












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    • By Lavino
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      The beatyful chapel..








    • By Lavino
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      This is when it was used for the telecommunications







    • By Urbexbandoned
      History
       
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      The Explore 
       
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      1: The Exterior 
       

       
      2: The inside looking back from the Altar 
       

       
      3: 
       

       
      4: 
       

       
      5: The right Transept windows 
       

       
      6: The remains of the Organ 
       

       
      7: The Original flooring, mostly covered in Pigeon Shit 
       

       
      8: One of the few remaining Stained Glass windows 
       

       
      9: The part I liked the most, still 100% intact too. A little slice of history
       

       
       


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