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Ivy Office, Scotland - Feb 2015

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Out and about looking for derps, drove past this interesting place by the roadside, turns out the cottage was lasted used as an office for a small firm.

Quite shit, but hey worth a couple pics :thumb






Not the best, but far from the worst I've done, still another one ticked off the list and a 40 min explore done :thumb

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