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Merryprankster

Belgium Central Station - July - 2015

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Roight so most of these angles you will have already seen courtesy of mr raw but i figured id chuck mine up all the same. What an epic place! seriously lucky to have had the opportunity to get up here and see thie amazing building, big thanks to the guys in antwerp for sorting this out- you know who you are ;) and big thanks to raw for liaising with the antwerp guys and making this possible! there is a few of the public interior thrown in aswell just to give an idea of the place as a whole, stupidly the only external i have is on film so might have to throw it up later maybe. such good fun running around the roof walkways with tripod in one hand and a beer in the other, couldn't think of a better way to spend the evening, loved looking down through the grill of the walkway and seeing all the people in the station below wandering around completely oblivious to us little scamps upstairs! Awesome once in a lifetime shizzle :) explored with raw, curiousgeorge and my ol mate jane.

Bit of history

The Antwerp Central Station is one of the world's most impressive railway stations. Dubbed the 'Railway Cathedral', it is one of the main landmarks in Antwerp.

Central Station, Antwerp

Central Station

The railway station was built between 1895 and 1905 and replaced a wooden train station built in 1854 by engineer Auguste Lambeau.

Today the whole complex is over 400 meters (1300ft) long and has two entrances, a historic domed building at the Astrid square and a modern atrium at the Kievit square.

There are three levels of tracks and a shopping center which includes a diamond gallery with more than thirty diamond shops.

The domed building

The monumental main building was designed by the Bruges architect L. Delacenserie. It has a huge dome and eight smaller towers of which six were demolished during the 1950s. Fortunately, these were reconstructed in 2009 Clock and Antwerp Coat of Arms, Central Station, Antwerp

Station interior

together with several ornaments including large lion statues.

The rich interior is lavishly decorated with more than twenty different kinds of marble and stone. The main hall and the railway cafeteria can match the interiors of many palaces. Not a single square meter either inside or outside the building is not decorated.

The train shed

Antwerp Central Station Interior

The platforms are covered by a huge iron and glass vaulted ceiling, which was restored in the 1990s. Besides the platform, the vault also covers many of the small diamond and gold shops, which are part of the diamond district next to the Central Station.

The huge glass vault was designed by the architect J. Van Asperen. It is 185 meters long and 44 meters at its highest point. The original platform and tracks themselves are elevated, the two lower levels were added later to accommodate the high speed train connection to Amsterdam.

few internals to start

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and the awesomeness of the roof!

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spot the raw?!

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thanks for looking kids!

Edited by Merryprankster

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