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Knostrop treatment works outlet, Leeds - July 2015

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Myself and Raz went down a cool drain in Leeds last night, read Raz's report here;

http://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/showthread.php/9536-Knostrop-treatment-works-outlet-Leeds-July-2015?p=79018#post79018

Press HD - Little walk about

Video doesnt do the smell justice :grin:

I have enough photos for a report but ill save them for the near future

Nice little mooch about and thanks for looking :thumb

Edited by Hydro3xploric

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Nice vid there mate I thought I could hear you retching lol :lol:

Weren't just retching... right under the sewer plant :thumb

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      Today, as the surface space has been significantly reduced, large proportions of the small streams and brooks that flow into the River Mersey have been culverted. Even though the industry in Runcorn has been in rapid decline in recent years, new housing developments have been established in their place, so the culverts remain. Double Trouble, which derives its name from the large dual entranceway, is one of those drains. It is made up of several different sized chambers that are positioned between sections of RCP. Double Trouble also features a number of concrete stairs that are encased within brickwork; these structures allow water to follow with the natural gradient of the landscape and so prevent water from accumulating at certain junctions in the drain. 

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