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UK Shadow Factory Tunnels, Birmingham - Aug 15

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Explored with FatPanda, Raz & Jord

Bit Of History;

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In 1854 J. S. Nettlefold, a Birmingham screw manufacturer, had revolutionized his industry by introducing automated American machinery. Room was needed to house this; Nettlefold, joined by his brother-in-law Joseph Chamberlain, father of the statesman, established the Heath Street Works in Cranford Street, Smethwick. The firm (until 1874 Nettlefold & Chamberlain and then Nettlefolds Ltd.) dominated the market by the mid 1860s. Among those prominent in its development was the younger Joseph Chamberlain, who joined it in 1854 and soon afterwards took charge of the commercial side of the organization. He became a partner in 1869 and remained with the firm until 1874, when he retired to devote himself to politics. The firm had by then begun to acquire additional premises. In 1869 it bought the Imperial Mills, which stood on the north side of Cranford Street, opposite the Heath Street Works. The mills were converted for the manufacture of nuts and bolts, and a wire-drawing mill, a bar shop, and a nail-making shop were built. In 1880, the year in which it became a limited company, Nettlefolds took over one of its local rivals, the Birmingham Screw Co., which had set up its St. George's Works in Grove Lane in 1868. The newly acquired works was almost as large as the Heath Street Works and faced it from the opposite bank of the Birmingham Canal.

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Although the firm continued to expand, its profits fluctuated considerably during the last twenty years of the 19th century, and in 1902 the merger for which Arthur Keen had been working took place: Nettlefolds joined Guest, Keen & Co. to form Guest, Keen & Nettlefolds Ltd. By the outbreak of the First World War the new company produced over half the screws and about a quarter of the nuts and bolts made in the country. The amalgamation made the firm the largest employer in the town. In the late 1960s the headquarters of Guest, Keen & Nettlefolds Ltd., by then an investment company, adjoined the Heath Street Works, a 50-acre complex run by G.K.N. Screws and Fasteners Ltd. and employing some 4,500 people. G.K.N. had several other subsidiaries in Smethwick. G.K.N. Distributors Ltd. had its headquarters at the London Works, while G.K.N. Group Services Ltd. was in Cranford Street, G.K.N. Reinforcements Ltd. in Alma Street, and G.K.N. Fasteners Corrosion Laboratory in Abberley Street. Smethwick Drop Forgings Ltd. of Rolfe Street, acquired by G.K.N. in 1963, was run as a subsidiary of G.K.N. Forgings Ltd.

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The Explore;

Whilst in the area it would be rude not to have a look at these tunnels so off we went, the factory above isn't much to look at, just your generic soggy shithole. What lies beneath however is a warren of tunnels stretching far beyond the current buildings. Some seriously dodgey looking water, id recommend wellies in future :thumb

Few pics;

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Couple of shots from playing around in the ruined factory;

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Thanks for looking :thumb

Edited by Hydro3xploric
Posted before id finished

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Only one picture mate?

Computer had a fit and posted the report while i was writing it - sorted now!

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I remember popping down here with Lara and she asked me do I need my Wellies and like a descent fella said no it will be fine :lol:

Some nice bit around down there and nice work guys :thumb

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I remember popping down here with Lara and she asked me do I need my Wellies and like a descent fella said no it will be fine :lol:

Some nice bit around down there and nice work guys :thumb

Cheers mate :thumb - i was fine in my converse lol

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4 hours ago, Exploring With Cam said:

Hey Guys. I also love exploring abandoned places. where might I find this place

 

You are new to the forum. You have shown nothing and not written anything yet; you did not even introduce yourself (Just take a moment & say Hi).
But you ask immediately where to find a place. Do you seriously expect an answer to your question? Sorry, but that does not work. 

 

Maybe this hobby is still quite new to you, I don't know. If, search for abandoned places by yourself, keep your eyes open. And you can also find many places with pics, names & location on the Internet. 
In particular (before you ask for locations here): Take part in the Forum, show photos, comment on posts, make contacts and meet people. Then you might be taken to abandoned places.
By the way: You just have to read the description & history and take time for searching, then you could find it by yourself. 

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