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Sleaford Bass Maltings - Walkaround

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Went for a revisit to an old favourite at the weekend - only took about 10 pics but i made a lengthy video

Press HD - Enjoy :thumb

Thanks for looking :ugeek:

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Cool video mate, i do like it here. Bit of a ballache fence hopping at times but it was nice to see bits that were previously sealed on my first few visits :)

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  • Similar Content

    • By he who must rome
      History has been done and done again, didn't have much time here bloody shame !, we only scratched the surface and need to go back soon as but time was against us from the start.....







      if anyone is going here pm me please.....nick
    • By RiF
      NOTE: Dont get your hopes up about this place, its sealed up now
      The buildings were originally the site of the Beeston Brewery which was founded in 1896 and carried on production until 1922 when it was taken over by Shipstones & Sons and converted into maltings, which served the main brewerys in Nottingham.
      Beeston was the first pneumatic maltings in Britain. It was constructed in 1878, for Messrs Waite, Corbould and Faulkner of the Beeston Brewery Company. It was closely followed by one for Messrs Flowers and Sons at Stratford-upon-Avon, Two other pneumatic maltings on the same system were constructed shortly afterwards, firstly for Nimmo and Sons at the Castle Eden Brewery, County Durham, and then slightly later for Messrs Sedgwick and Co at Watford. Of these examples, the only building known to survive with at least its original shell is that at Beeston. Two other pneumatic maltings on the same system were constructed shortly afterwards, firstly for Nimmo and Sons at the Castle Eden Brewery, County Durham, and then slightly later for Messrs Sedgwick and Co at Watford. Of these examples, the only building known to survive with at least its original shell is that at Beeston.
      Unfortunately this traditional floor maltings, which supplied many of the country’s craft brewers, closed in 2000 for redevelopment as residential units.
      Visited with Raptor Jesus




















      The remaining photo's not shown here can be viewed here: Maltings
      Thanks for looking
      RiF
    • By Zen1991
      History- The building is from the 'railway era'. The hotel was a hub of the community, it had a fantastic ballroom and restaurant. Many people came by rail to stay at Sutton Bridge. 
      The hotel from around 2000 was used by an employment agency called StaffSmart to house workers they had lured over to the UK from South Africa to work in the local canning factory. People came from SA on the promise of hotel accommodation and didn't know until they got here that it meant inside the shell of the Bridge Hotel on damp mattresses lined up in each room, including the Ballroom. After StaffSmart vacated the hotel, it stood empty with broken windows until it was bought and restored to a high standard with plush furnishings and chandeliers. However, the hotel rooms were pricey and without the rail trade of people heading to the village, people would be passing through and tended to stay in cheaper accommodation in the area. The hotel wasn't open for long before closing down and ownership passed through several hands whilst falling further into disrepair. 
      In 2015, workmen were spotted on the site removing roof tiles and floorboards to salvage as many building materials before it was demolished but its still standing now, so I don't know what stopped the demolition. Since then the building has unfortunately been vandalised and several fires have been set destroying about 70% of it. 
       

      The Bridge Hotel in the 50's
       
      Explore- The hotel is close to me, so even though I knew the damage of the place it was still worth checking out. Access to the building was easy, a window round back was broken and a board to climb up to it was balanced kind of safely. The cellar floor, ground floor and a few rooms on the first floor were safe enough to walk around but past that there is a lot of fire damage. 
       
      Pictures- 

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

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