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Perfection Farm, Scotland - June 2015

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Another mini installment of my recent venture up north to this lovely wee farm.

Not much infor on it, but some lovely colours and a cracking wee derp shed, everyone loves a derp shed!!

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Thanks for looking!

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I keep looking at that contraption in the last shot trying to figuer out what it is?

I can see there a two bit to exstend wicks and a pump to get pressure?

I have no idea lol :D

It is a Perfection Oil cabinet (where the name came of the place came from). They are old wick controlled oil cookers, found a bit about them on the net :-

MORE THAN 4,500,000 Perfection Oil Cook Stoves now in use are evidence of their world-wide popularity. Wherever the old methods of cooking with wood or coal for fuel have given way to modern methods, Perfection Oil Cook Stoves will be found giving clean, odorless and dependable service, with cooking satisfaction that is equal to that of gas. Perfection's world leadership is a matter of 37 years of continuous production of oil stoves of outstanding convenience and dependability.

"Perfection stoves ideally fulfill every cooking requirement," is the verdict of America's most famous cooks, including Mrs. Sarah Tyson Borer, Miss Rosa Michaelis, Miss Lucy G. Allen, Mrs. Belle DeGraf, Miss Margaret Allen Hall and Mrs. Kate B. Vaughn.

The famous cotton wick burner of the Perfection assures a flame that remains steady wherever set. The high, yellow-tipped flame is best for

fast cooking ; the low blue flame for slow simmering.

Correct draft is of the utmost importance in perfect combustion of kerosene. The Perfection long-chimney burner is scientifically designed to admit just the right amount of air, with ample space to hold it until combustion is complete. No flame, but a powerful column of clean, intense heat strikes the cooking utensils which never become soiled with smoke or soot.

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    • By lucan
      looking on maps i spotted what looked like a line of old cars and some farm sheds
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       thanks for looking
       
      more on my flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/128166151@N05/albums/72157687420807965
       
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    • By Grey Walker
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    • By Grey Walker
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    • By WildBoyz
      History

      Today, Newsham is a small suburb of Blyth. Blyth itself, meaning ‘gentle’ or ‘merry’ in Old English, is a town and civil parish in Northumberland, England, and from the early 18th century the town rapidly expanded as a result of the Industrial Revolution, as coal mining, fishing and ship building industries quickly established a foothold in the area. Newsham quickly became part of the town as new houses were required for the growing number of workers in the area. Prior to the growth of industry, however, it is noted in John Wallace’s History of Blyth and a number of other sources that Newsham comprised only a few farms and a mansion as early as 1341, which were occupied by the prominent Ogle family. Despite the distinguished status of the Ogle family though, it is reported that the main holders of the lands and buildings at Newsham were in fact the Delaval family. They owned the lands from the 12th century right up until the 17th century. 

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      Following the death of Radclyffe, the Newsham estate fell into the hands of the Ridley family. At some point during their tenure of the lands (one source suggests 1880) the mansion was dismantled and the materials were said to have been used to construct a farmhouse. Another source from 1720 suggests that the former mansion was already in a state of dilapidation, with it being described as ‘an ancient structure but something ruinous’. An additional reason for its demolition may be attributed to the fact that the mansion itself was a relatively basic structure; it was only two storeys high, the grand hall was plain and simple and it had only a small number of surrounding buildings. In other words, the building was no longer deemed important enough to warrant its ‘mansion’ status. 

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      Our night beganwith high aspirations. To start off with, we tried our luck at getting ourselves inside an abandoned museum. As it turned out, the museum was much less abandoned that we’d first thought. A large number of sensors were the first indication that the site was still quite active, and then the alarms we triggered supported the fact even further. We left in a hurry, feeling fairly disappointed, and continued on well into the night trying various other explores that would all turn out badly. As a last resort we found ourselves just outside Newsham, where we decided that we’d try our luck with a farmhouse we’d recently heard about.

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      Inside the house it felt as though we were suddenly in an episode of Only Fools and Horses. In fact, for the entire half an hour we spent in that building it felt exactly as though we were in Nelson Mandela House. For instance, the carpets throughout the building were… Well, they were very different by conventional standards. We might even go so far as to say they were a little spicy. What is more, though, is that even the furniture matched the Peckham vibe we had going on. We were half expecting to find Uncle Albert in the living room sitting in one of the armchairs sipping on a snifter of rum, or a blow-up sex doll tucked away in a cupboard somewhere. Needless to say, we found neither. Unfortunately, we were prompted to move on to the other buildings on the site after hearing what we thought sounded like a riot outside. In the knowledge that we didn’t have any ski gear to protect ourselves, or a Russian VCR to film it, we decided to split. 

      As for the rest of the premises, it had its own unique bits and quirks, such as the pianos we stumbled across in small backroom, or the strange dining room setup inside one of the large barns. All in all, then, considering the place looked like an incredibly trashed farm from the outside it ended up being a decent wander. After taking a look around the entire site and seeing everything there was to see, we headed back to the car. It was just starting to snow at this point, so it was time to switch the car heater to full blast and warm up a wee bit. 

      Explored with Meek-Kune-Do.
       
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