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cgeff

France Ferme des Sports - November 2014

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Interesting little place, like the dressing table shot :)

Got any info/history of what the place is? Your explore etc?

Cheers for sharing :thumb

:comp:

Edited by hamtagger

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I do not know the history of this House

It seems abandoned for some time

from what I know, members of the family still live in the area

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