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Old Police Station, Pontefract - Sept 15

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With Kind permission of Pontefract Town hall - Visited with Ant

Background;

The building was built in 1785 and was the first building ever to hold a secret ballot so is the birthplace of our modern elections. The building has many beautiful rooms one of which contains a monument to Lord Nelson. It has jail cells in it's basements the door to which can be seen on the outside of the building. The building was home to the towns police force and was the Police Station for the town over 150 years ago, when Pontefract Borough had one of the oldest established police forces in the Country. The cells were last used in the early 1960s, when the Court House in Pontefract was being renovated and the Courts were held in the Town Hall.

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Unfortunately the actual police station has been converted from a victorian style house of the law into a NPT desk for the WY police and so only the holidng cell and the older cells which are almost unrecognisable due to it being used as a coal store, are viewable to the public.

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As mentioned above the hall holds a little bit of fame, an original part of Nelsons collum showing Nelsons last moments at the battle of Trafalgar aboard the HMS Victory, which was brought to Pontefract via horse and cart in 6 pieces. Our guide Stan was kind enough to let us have a look around the Nelson room (Old court room);

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Thanks for looking :thumb

Edited by Hydro3xploric
Various gramatical errors

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Thats cool and like the look of that :D

Not everyday you can snoop around the bowels of your local town hall :thumb

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  • Similar Content

    • By TheBaronof Scotland
      Visited with Scattergun and Stussy (and 2 non members)
      The station was opened on 10 August 1896 by the Glasgow Central Railway. The station building was on ground level, and the platforms were underground, beneath the Glasgow Botanic Gardens. It was closed between 1 January 1917 and 2 March 1919 due to wartime economy, and closed permanently to passengers on 6 February 1939, with the line being closed on 5 October 1964






      cheers
    • By Lavino
      a recent visit with @woopashoopaa @Telf and @GRONK was a fun day out had by all of us.visited various locations so on to the police station after have a good look around and telf working out our way on site we spotted our entry point finally got in all was good headed streight upstairs was going well till we reached the ground floor and got busted. so not many pictures as i was more busy looking around and to be honest not really much to see a bit of history and pics....
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      A Greater Manchester Police spokesman said: “We recommend that the public do not enter condemned buildings and adhere to safety signs that are on these buildings.
      “We will arrest and detain anyone who is caught breaking and entering.â€







    • By WildBoyz
      History

      Highgate Station was constructed in 1867, by the Edgware, Highgate and London Railway, in a deep cutting that was excavated from Highgate Hill. The two tunnels penetrating the hillside from either side of the station were built some years before the station itself. Highgate Station was designed so that it had two side platforms and three tracks between them. A station building was constructed to the south end of the platform, along with a covered footbridge which connected the two platforms. The entire station was rebuilt in the 1880s, and a new central platform with two tracks flanking either side was constructed. The island could be accessed via a ticket office located in the middle of the footbridge.

      The station was altered again in 1935, as part of the ‘Northern Heights’ project that sought to incorporate the Edgware, High Barnet and Alexandra Palace lines into the London Transport Network. The first stage of the project involved the construction of tube tunnels underneath Highgate Station. To provide an interchange between the new deep-level platforms and the existing surface platforms, a subterranean pedestrian network was built immediately beneath Highgate Station. Stairs and escalators were installed to connect the existing platforms with the new underground ones, and street entrances to the concourse were built on Archway Road and Priory Gardens. As the pedestrian footbridge was no longer required, it was demolished along with some parts of the original buildings. The remaining sections of the older buildings were redeveloped, together with the surface platforms themselves which received some minor alterations. 

      Following World War Two, plans to improve Highgate Station were never fully completed. As other sections of London’s Railways required urgent maintenance, and were deemed more important as they were more central to the heart of the city, Highgate became less of a priority. Despite being labelled as ‘under construction’ for years on various maps, by the early 1950s passenger services at Highgate’s surface Station ceased, but freight traffic continued to pass through the station until 1964. After freight traffic ceased to operate on this section of the line, it was used only for occasional London Underground rolling stock transfers between Highgate Depot and the Northern City line; however, since it was never electrified the stock had to be pulled over the lines using battery-powered locomotives. All activity ceased on Highgate’s surface lines by 1970, due to the poor structural integrity of some of the nearby bridges. 

      Presently, one of the original 1867 buildings still stands; this is rumoured to be used as a residential building. As for the station itself, a number of the older buildings were demolished, leaving only the 1940s structures standing. Plastic sheeting was used to cover the old track bed after the rails were removed, to prevent water from seeping into the northern lines concourse which lies below. Much of the old route between Finsbury Park and Alexandra Palace is now part of the Parkland Walk; however, this bypasses the station for health and safety reasons. 

      Our Version of Events

      Getting into London by car wasn’t quite as bad as we’d imagined, but finding a spot to park was an absolute nightmare. As we toured the city for a bit, looking for somewhere to stop the car, we noticed that people seem to squeeze into any spot available; there were mere centimetres between some of them! Finally, after much searching, we found a space (thankfully) that wasn’t too far from Highgate Station. Judging by some of the cars that were parked near us, and the moss growing on their rooves, a few of them seem to have been there for a long time. Having witnessed this, we think we now understand, a bit more clearly, why there’s such a parking problem in London. 

      Since we’d heard the station was situated in a hillside and surrounded by trees, we imagined finding it would be a bit of a challenge. As it turned out, however, we were wrong – it’s very visible. Gaining access wasn’t difficult either, which we were also surprised about given that there’s a busy station next door; we had gauged that it might be difficult to slip onto the old premises without being seen with such a high volume of people around. Once again we were mistaken in our assumption, as no one seemed to give a shit that we looked slightly suspicious milling around an abandoned site with tripods and cameras, meaning we were able to wander into the station very easily. Once onsite, even though people could probably see us quite clearly from the live station and a public footpath which runs alongside the platform, no one glanced our way; instead, everyone seemed more intent on rushing to wherever it was they were going. 

      After a quick wander around the site it was obvious that there isn’t much there, and all of the tunnel portals are sealed, together with the additional doorway we found down the staircase on the main platform. The station itself was less impressive than it looked from old pictures we’d found of it, but it felt very odd, in a good way, being in part of the City of London that certainly didn’t feel like a city at all. Inside the small gully it was peaceful and we encountered trees and foxes – three things we never thought we’d find in the capital. The next fifteen minutes were spent taking in the quiet atmosphere and a few photographs, before we decided to head off to the next explore we had lined up. Overall, then, the site is perfect is you’re passing through the area, especially if you fancy a break from the hustle and bustle, but it’s probably not worth travelling from further afield to visit it. 

      Explored with Ford Mayhem, Meek-Kune-Do and Husky. 
       
      Looking west at Highgate Station in 1868, when it first opened. 
       

       
      Highgate Station in the 1880s, looking west, when the two side platforms were replaced. 
       

       
      The station in the early 1940s. The old 1800s toilet block was retained and incorporated into the overall design at this point.
       

       
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    • By TrevBish.co.uk
      This place is incredible! Loads of interesting things and live CCTV that you can have a play around with. We could actually see people walking past the building we were in. We heard some noise which we assumed was one of our group, but as we later found out, it was someone locking the door and we got sealed in! 
       
      History borrowed from: http://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/topic/10420-centrale-de-schneider-power-station-france-january-2016/#comment-67316

      Opening in the late 1950s Centrale De Schneider was a coal-fired power station in France. The original configuration two turbines made by Cie Electro-Mecanique (the French subsidiary of Brown Boveri) was expanded in the 1970s with the addition of a Rateau-Schneider generator set, bringing the total capacity up to half a gigawatt. The Electro-Mecanique turbines were retired in the early 1990s and all the associated equipment has since been removed. The power station ceased generation a few years ago when the Rateau-Schneider was also taken offline.
       
       

       
       
       

       
       
       

       
       
       

       
       
       

       
       
       

       
       
       

       
       
       

       
       
       

       
       
       

       
       
       

       
       
       

       
       
       

       
       
       

       
       
       

       
       
      Thanks for looking! 
       
       
    • By MrT
      Had chance to visit this place with permission so living down the road i thought it was worth popping in. The Old Nick was the original police station in Gainsborough. It is an Italianate-style Grade II building at the junction of Spring Gardens and Cross Street - just above the vehicular access to Marshall's Yard. Back in 1859 land on this site was sold to build a Magistrates' Court and Police Station. These buildings served their purpose until 1972 when the new police station on Morton Terrace was built followed by the new Magistrates' Court on Church Street in 1978. The court room is now the main theatre, still can see the main structure but they were practising for a show so no great photos, again with the judges rest room, its the costume room. 
       
      Down stairs though, pretty untouched are the cells, interview room, doctors room, check in desk and exercise yard.
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      Few other bits and bobs to see, this is it really. If you close by and get the chance its worth it. Another local one im glad to get off the list anyways 

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