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USA Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division Oct 2015

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I wasn't quite sure whether to stick this in military or industrial, but it's more of an industrial site that was used by the military so here it goes. This was my last explore of my American trip, on my last full day in the country and after driving around Trenton having a few fails and being totally sketched out by how much of a massive craphole the city is we plumped for an easy guaranteed in.

The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division (NAWCAD for short) was constructed in 1953 directly adjacent to Trenton Mercer Airport and was used by the US Navy to test jet engines, alternate fuels, turbines and engine starters until the facility closed in 1998 due to a relocation to Tennessee. Two thirds of the site was demolished with the land handed over to a homeless charity at no cost, but as yet nothing has happened. What is left is the closest you could possibly get to a secondary Pyestock, with three test cells still in situ and the huge power plant building which at one point would have held two rows of eight turbines/exhausters to provide enough power to rival that of Pyestock's famous Air House. Sadly the turbines are no more, with just the plinths left but it's still an impressive space.

Having kicked myself for missing out on a return to Pyestock with my decent gear during it's final days, I had known about and wanted to see this place for ages so it was great to see what was in essence Pyestock's little brother across the pond. The few bits of pipe left on the outside of the buildings are even that same evocative shade of light blue which made Pyestock's pipes instantly recognisable.

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Thanks for looking, more here :Phttps://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/albums/72157659895110111

I hope you've enjoyed my selection of things from across the pond, all I have left to bring you now is a compilation of the seven or so locations I didn't get enough photos from to warrant separate threads and I'm all done! I'll be back over in the springtime all being well.

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