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The_Raw

Other The Guoson Centre, Beijing - October 2015

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Dongzhimen is Asia’s largest transportation hub, connecting 3 subway lines, buses, the airport express, and the Second Ring Road. The Guoson Centre aimed to take advantage of this with a 600,000 square metre space including a transport interchange, retail mall, five-star luxury hotel, two office towers and residential apartments. However a long term equity dispute lasting 7 years has meant the complex remains unfinished and accumulating debts. The exteriors of the buildings look all but finished from a distance but they are just empty shells.

I visited here with a couple of friends on my recent holiday with the intention of scaling one of the abandoned 35 storey twin towers. Unfortunately we were spotted by a nosey neighbour who shouted for security so we had to make do with one of the smaller buildings in the complex instead. Still, at 20 storeys high the views were pretty decent and it was nice to look down on somewhere a bit different from London. There are much bigger skyscrapers than this under construction but I am told they have workers on site 24 hours a day. The unfinished mall was just concrete floors and pillars, I didn't bother getting my camera out as it was dark but I reckon it would definitely be worth a daytime visit as it's pretty huge. The amount of unfinished construction projects in China is astounding, apparently it's quite common there to build the shells of buildings and forget about them for a few years. It's certainly a fast developing country.

1.

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2. My first chance to have a play with my new fish eye up high

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3.

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4.

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5.

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6. Working through the night

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7.

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8.

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9. Part of the unfinished mall is visible in the bottom left of the shot

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10.

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11. The abandoned twin towers

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12.

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13. Raffles City, a roaring success of a similar complex down the road

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14. Totally staged 'looking hard and covering my identity' UE selfie

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Thanks for looking :thumb

Edited by The_Raw

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Cheers for the comments

Also, why are those twin towers abandoned? What were they?

They were going to be office blocks until there was a financial dispute between two construction companies 7 years ago and the project has been stalled ever since

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