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skeleton key

Infiltration, Underground London.

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A few visits to various sections over the past few years and thought I may as well do something with the clips taken. ;)

It might not link as showing error in linking and to try latter :P

Edited by skeleton key

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That was fantastic Video and snapshots.

Its surprising how many tube stations have been out of use in the past.One i would love to explore would be the station that used to be called The Strand and got changed to Aldwich,its meant to have another tunnel somewhere that was used in the 1900s.

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Aldwych has two tunnels from Holborn, the original one you allude to is broken up into sections. It's where they shot the Prodigy 'Firestarter' video, as well as in one of the disused lift shafts. We tried to re-create it, but i don't think the video ever made the light of day. Probably for the best :)

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      28.

       
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