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UK Brognyton Hall, Shropshire - October 2015

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The Visit

A very early morning start with redhunter, Funlester and a non member. Bumped into a farmer who asked what we were doing but some quick thinking that we were looking for some high ground to photograph the morning mist over the fields worked a treat and he left wishing us good luck!

This is a great explore and some fantastic features inside, real shame we couldn't access the basement but a great explore otherwise :)

The History

This is a dominating Neoclassical Grade II listed mansion situated in Shropshire. It was originally constructed in 1735 and stands in a magnificent parkland of nearly 1500 acres of land. The mansion is famed for it's four giant iconic columns and was once owned by royalty. It's nickname 'House of Tears' comes from the fact that three of it's owners died from tragic circumstances, two fatal car crashes and a suicide. The basement of the mansion was once used as a telecommunications headquarters during World War II for the spy network in Europe, much of the original equipment is still down there. The property was sold to developers in 2000 but they have neglected to carry out much work since, they recently put it back on the market and are currently undergoing some restoration work inside.

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Edited by hamtagger
Removed excess Flickr coding

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Nice light coming through in that second shot mate. And nice blagging the farmer lol :D

There seems to be some excess Flickr Bbcode appearing in your reports. When you paste the code from Flickr only keep the bits from %7Boption%7D and [img/] and delete the rest of the code. You can check if the image is displaying without the excess coding coming out of the corner by clicking "preview post". Cheers dude! :thumb

There's a guide here if you need to use it :)http://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/showthread.php/9470-How-to-Trim-Flickr-BBcodes

:comp:

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Cheers mate, I'll keep an eye out for that in future. Things like that bug me and my OCD but with posting a few reports I got sloppy haha. Thanks again

Nice one bud lol :thumb

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Beautiful building, but that's a weird construction at picture 2 :confused:

That's just to support the ceiling, it must be a weak spot....

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