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UK St. Saviours Church, Bacup - August 2015

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The Visit

Lowlight for me was falling through the dodgy MDF floor upstairs, luckily didn't go right through as a beam caught me in what you can imagine was a little painful. That aside, this is a lovely little church and still in relatively nice condition.

The History

The origins of St. Saviour's At Stubbylee Hall, Bacup, lived Mr. John Holt, J.P., a Christian man with a real concern for the spiritual needs of the people living on his estate around the Lee Mill area. His dreams of building a church were not fulfilled in his own lifetime. When St. John's fell into a state of extreme disrepair and collapse a committee was formed to rebuild it but progress in making the necessary arrangements was so slow that one of the members of the committee, Mr. James Maden Holt (the son of Mr. John Holt) withdrew and determined to go ahead with the building of a church at Stubbylee. After obtaining the consent of the incumbent of St. John's, the Rev. B. Tweedale, and of the Bishop of the diocese to the assignment of a district for the proposed new church, Mr. Holt looked round for a suitable clergyman to tackle the undertaking. He learned that the Rev. William Whitworth, Vicar of St. Jude's, Ancoats, was willing to accept the onerous task of working up the new- parish and invited him to be the first vicar. Mr. Whitworth was duly licensed and began his labours in an old mill at Rockliffe. It was intended that these premises should be only temporary so very few alterations were made. The floor was covered with sawdust and benches mounted on bricks were used as pews. Worship commenced there in 1854.

Work now began on the Sunday School building in New Line and was completed in 1858. The congregation and scholars were called together for a final address by Mr. Whitworth in Rockliffe Mill. A procession then formed and marched to the new school, which was opened by Mr. Whitworth who gave a further address. The upper part of the school was used as a church for the next few years. The vicarage was built next and Mr. Whitworth took up residence there about 1860, shortly before the building of the church commenced.

The church was consecrated on Monday, the 23rd of January, 1865, by the Lord Bishop of Manchester, the Right Rev. J. Fraser, and was designated "St. Saviour's, Bacup". Representatives of the local Wesleyan, Baptist and Independent churches were present at the service.

The cost of the erection of the church, school and vicarage was borne entirely by Mr. James Maden Holt and amounted, as near as can be ascertained, to £8,000, £2,000 and £1,400 respectively, exclusive of the value of the sites











And finally, the resulting hole in the floor :(


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Are you gonna fix that ? :P Thank god you didn't get hurt bad, probably you were at the right place ;)

Looks like a big church to me, nice shots!

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I did actually feel quite bad about it afterwards but it was just wet MDF that I'm sure would need replacing at some points anyhow. Serves me right for not looking were I was going, lesson learnt :)

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Falling through floors can't be helped... Glad you weren't hurt.

Cool shots there man and a tidy looking building (other than the mess you caused;))

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That floor held me fine back in May!

Love this church, it's my favourite derelict church on home soil. Plus it looks like you had better weather than my visit in absolutely torrential rain...

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Not sure when you went. But went recently has near by on another adventure. And well the place has been boarded up and some new secca stuff around. But the old building next to it was open with two lovely pianos in it. Thats where i got the people shot lol. Think its due to all the windows being smashed etc. But lovely to see it again went ohhh 3 years back now lol. Stunning place thx for the memories

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This is such a wonderful looking church, I remember seeing [MENTION=262]mookster[/MENTION] 's report and wanting to visit. Still the same after seeing this now. Those windows really are beautiful. The stained glass is stunning and I bet on a sunny day the colours are amazing.

Great set of pics and do be careful, your bollox might have saved you this time but next time might be a different story


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Damn the place looks like it's holding up pretty well, definitely a fan of those immaculate stained glass windows too :)

Glad you survived the fall!! :thumb

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