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Chapelle des Loups

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    • By The_Raw
      Another visit from October with @Andy, @Maniacand@extreme_ironing. From seeing Andy's report I missed quite a few bits but you can't see everything unless you spend the whole day down there. Another epic bit of WW2 history and there's lots more out there.   
       
      Ouvrage Mont des Welches, a gros ouvrage of the Maginot Line fortifications, is part of the Fortified Sector of Boulay. It comprises two entrance blocks, one infantry block, one artillery block, one observation block and two combination blocks. The underground gallery system is compact, about 200 metres (660 ft) from end to end, and unlike larger ouvrages where the gallery system is linear in concept, the central portion of Mont des Welches is a dense network of tunnels crossing one another, housing the barracks and utility areas. The galleries are excavated at an average depth of up to 30 metres (98 ft). Unlike most gros ouvrages, its 60 cm internal rail network was not electrified, relying on human power to move the rail cars. Relatively small for a gros ouvrage, Mont des Welches saw a brief period of sharp action in June 1940, when German forces moving along the rear of the Maginot Line engaged the position without success. The manning of the ouvrage in June 1940 comprised 490 men and 17 officers of the 167th Fortress Infantry Regiment and the 151st Position Artillery Regiment. After modest renovations in the 1950s, it was abandoned in the 1970s.
       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
        
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
      Bon journée  
    • By MiaroDigital
      A small but nice chapelle in Belgium...
       
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      Chapelle D M 01 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr
       
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      Chapelle D M 02 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr
       
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      Chapelle D M 03 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr
       
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      Chapelle D M 04 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr
       
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      Chapelle D M 05 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr
       
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      Chapelle D M 06 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr
       
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      Chapelle D M 07 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr
       
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      Chapelle D M 08 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr
    • By Andy
      Ouvrage Mont des Welches, a gros ouvrage of the Maginot Line fortifications, is part of the Fortified Sector of Boulay. It comprises two entrance blocks, one infantry block, one artillery block, one observation block and two combination blocks. It is located between petit ouvrage Coucou and gros ouvrage Michelsberg, facing Germany. Relatively small for a gros ouvrage, Mont des Welches saw a brief period of sharp action in June 1940, when German forces moving along the rear of the Maginot Line engaged the position without success. After modest renovations in the 1950s, Mont des Welches was abandoned in the 1970s.
      Mont des Welches was approved for construction by CORF (Commission d'Organisation des Régions Fortifiées), the Maginot Line's design and construction agency, in June 1930 and became operational by 1935, at a cost of 49 million francs. The contractor was Gianotti of Nice.
      The comparatively small gros ouvrage comprises two entrance blocks, one infantry block, one artillery block, one observation block, and two combination blocks. It lacks a central "M1" ammunition magazine, and unlike most gros ouvrages, its 60 cm internal rail network was not electrified, relying on human power to move the rail cars. The underground gallery system is compact, about 200 metres (660 ft) from end to end, and unlike larger ouvrages where the gallery system is linear in concept, the central portion of Mont des Welches is a dense network of cross galleries between to main galleries, housing the barracks and utility areas. The galleries are excavated at an average depth of up to 30 metres (98 ft).
      The manning of the ouvrage in June 1940 comprised 490 men and 17 officers of the 167th Fortress Infantry Regiment and the 151st Position Artillery Regiment, commanded by Chef de Bataillon Tari. The units were under the umbrella of the 42nd Fortress Corps of the 3rd Army, Army Group 2.
       
      Visited with @The_Raw, @extreme_ironing & @Maniac.
       
       
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    • By Vief
      During a little trip through France i've visit this beautiful chapel. It's not in use anymore and from the outside you couldn't tell it's abandoned. 
      The entrance wasn't easy, but hey I made it  
      I really loved the decay here and I was suprised to see those statues still inside. Hopefully this will be remain.
       
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    • By SpiderMonkey
      Chapelle des Pelotes
       
      Visited this one with @AndyK! and @Jamie_P. First location on our long and tiring France trip which involved around 38 hours of driving and forcing our eyes open, along with 7 hours of sleeping, Win!
      This chapel was part of an old seminary, which also looked great,but we didn't visit that part unfortunately. This chapel was well worth the trip however, kept us occupied for a good couple of hours before heading to the next. 

      Upon arriving we parked up in the sort of small village where you immediately draw attention to yourself, because you're driving around in the only English vehicle for miles  
      We walked up to our decided entry point into the grounds which was not too difficult, although it required some mission impossible style rolling to avoid the eagle eyes of the locals  A car drove past whilst one of us were getting into the grounds, stopped and began to reverse, but within the short time between stopping and reversing, we were straight out of sight, danger roll win!
       
      Anyway, enough rambling..


       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      Cheers
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