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Urbflections - Stick your camera in a puddle

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    • By hamtagger
      Canwick Cemetery Chapel
       
      The Explore
       
      One from March last year. This place has been derelict for a number of years and I had been keeping an eye on the place for probably 2 years previous to that as I regularly had to drive past the cemetery. Around once a month I made a point of stopping, pretending to visit some dead-relatives' grave and when no one was looking used to hop the heras and check the doors. About a billion times they were the same as always and I cursed the local kids and drunks for being crap, until finally one day myself and @Urbexbandoned were on a stroll through the cemetery and noticed some fresh beer cans near the heras and the door looking ever so slightly ajar.. winner!. Couldn't have a look that day as a groundsman was busy astro-turfing a rectangle nearby but returned the next day for a solo visit, then a few days later with @Urbexbandoned. I don't think the assumed-drunk had entered as I had to push a layer of pigeon shit about 2 inches thick behind the door. No-one had been in there for a very long time and also it was a shame the wooden staircase up the bell tower had completely rotted away and collapsed at some point. A few people visited in the coming few months, then I noticed the door got boarded up again.
       
      The History
       
      Pair of former chapels, now disused. 1856. By Michael Drury. Coursed and squared rubble with ashlar dressings and plain tile roof. Gothic Revival style with pointed arched windows and Geometrical tracery. EXTERIOR: chamfered and moulded plinth, sill band, moulded eaves, coped gables with crosses and finials. North side has a central gable with an archway and shafts, flanked by single gabled buttresses. Beyond, single blocked 3-light windows. To left, the octagonal east chapel has angle buttresses and 3 gables, each with a 4-light window. Roof gablets. Fleche removed. To right, west chapel with apsidal end and buttresses, 3 bays, with six 2-light windows with hoodmoulds. In the north gable, a 5-light window. Square north-west tower, 3 stages, has to north a gabled doorway with shafts. Above, a trefoiled vescia piscis and to east, a 2-light window. Third stage has a foiled corbel table and to north, a rose window. On the other sides, 3-light windows. Spire removed. INTERIOR: east chapel has an arch braced conical roof with collars forming a corona. West chapel has a moulded stone arch to the apse, and an arch braced double purlin roof. Both chapels have foliage corbels - I have no idea what they are..
       
      The Pictures
       
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      Coffin shape on the ceiling..

       
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      As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated  
    • By hamtagger
      Calcott Hall
       
      The Explore
       
      Well, I'm a little behind on posting reports, 13 months behind to be exact. Mojo issues mixed with a busy year but generally can't be arsed with the whole thing. Normally this is where I'd write about the explore and what happened etc but I really can't remember much as it was last April and I've slept approximately 387 times since then. I had a quick squiz at @Urbexbandoned's report to jog my memory, to pinch the history, and to view all the items that I myself failed to photograph due to walking around with my eyes closed as normal. Easy derp to have a wander around and I think we had spent the previous few days sleeping in the car near, and inside of, a large hospital down south in Cardiff, then worked our way up to Shropshire and back to Lincoln on a lengthy road trip of derpy delights..
       
      History
      This was once a Dairy Farm, built in 1725 as a Georgian Farmhouse. It's most recent resident was Ellen Jones who died in the 70's. I believe that some of her family also lived there as there are lots of bits of paperwork for a Francis Jones & a gentleman with the same surname.
      This farmhouse has more or less a written / photographic story of the residents who once lived there.
      Cupboards littered with bread and cake making supplies and ingredients showed the life of a typical farmhouse wife.
      Exterior buildings litter the farmhouse, some still being used today with the farmland scattered with cattle.
      Set in a beautiful little countryside, I cant help but think this really would have been beautiful in it's day.
       
      The Pictures
       
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      Little bonus car in the garage in the grounds..

       
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      As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated  
       
    • By hamtagger
      George Barnsley Tools
       
      The Explore 
       
      I think it was a Sunday in January with @Urbexbandoned and we decided to make the shortish drive to Sheffield to have a look at this place as it seemed to have died down on the forums for the few months previous. It's now May and i'm just catching up with my shit and cursing Flickr for being a dick every time I get the motivation to post a report. We turned up early and got immediately lucky when a bloke with an early morning Maccies was entering the courtyard gates. Thanks to @Fekneejit for the information on the day, top lad and thank you. The entrance/exit was made considerably easier  
       
      The History (stolen from @KarlPhoto365)
       
      George Barnsley and Sons Ltd. (founded 1836) were in Cornish Place on the Don and specialized in forged filing and cutting tools for leather workers and shoe makers.  One George Barnsley was Master Cutler in 1883.
      George Barnsley and Son is listed in the 1837 Sheffield Directory as a file manufacture situated on Wheeldon Street.  The 1849 listing records a move to Cornhill and the 1852 to Cornesh works, Cornesh street.  They had by this time also increased there product range to include steel files, shoe and butchers knives.
      They are again listed in 1944 as manufactures of files and blades, shoe knives and leather workers tools.
      In the 1948 listing the business had become George Barnsley and Son Ltd.
      George Barnsley died at his home at No 30 Collegiate Crescent on 30th March 1958.  He lived there with his wife Mabel and mother-in-law Elizabeth.  He was a partner in the firm which manufactured steel and files.  The business was converted into a limited company about 10 years before his death.  He had a long army career, joining up in 1896 and serving in the Boer war and two world wars.  Colonel Barnsley played a leading part in the development of the Army Cadet Force in Sheffield.  He died at the age of 83.  
       
      The Pictures
       
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      Some nice posters that I walked past about five times before I noticed them up high on a wall..

       
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      As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated  
       
    • By hamtagger
      Lostock Power Station
       
      The Explore..
       
      Visited with @Urbexbandoned. Left Lincoln early and the car thermometer was reading -4.5C, then when we arrived at Lostock it had only climbed half a degree. We had a bit of prior info from @macc_explore so thanks for that mate. Quite a bit of ducking and diving to hide from various humans travelling to and from the secca checkpoint for the other part of the site and eventually got across the wasteland to where we wanted to be. Nice and peaceful explore once you're inside but it was bloody cold that day so when we were on the brink of hypothermia we exited and went for a traffic jam around liverpool thanks to the X-Factor or some shite. All in all a top day as always.
       
      The History.. (Stolen)
       
      Bowman Thompson & Company originally owned the site but was sold in 1900 to Brunner Mond whom with a seven year closure reconstructed the site producing sixty tonnes of soda ash a day. This figure rose to 800 tonnes a day in 1926 with all of the Brunner Mond assets being turned over to ICI.
      Lostock as a coal fired powerstation was decommissioned in 2000 when E.ON built there new Combined Heat & Power plant at Winnington and is due to be flattened for a new Sustainable Energy Plant to be built on the site.
       
      The Pictures..
       
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      What's left of the control room..

       
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      As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated  
       
    • By hamtagger
      RAF West Raynham
       

       
      The Explore
       
      A bit of a flying visit this one as we had other things to check out deeper into Norfolk that day and I was really only mainly interested in the peely action going on in the foyer to the Junior Ranks Mess and a few other bits and bobs. I might jump on the Errbex bus sometime in the future and mooch around the other bits but mostly likely i won't. Visited with @Urbexbandoned and thanks for the few tips beforehand from @Mikeymutt.
       
      The History (stolen as always)
       
      The airfield opened during May 1939 and was used by RAF Bomber Command during the Second World War with the loss of 86 aircraft. The station closed in 1994, though the Ministry of Defence (MoD) retained it as a strategic reserve. Having laid derelict since closure, the MoD elected in 2004 that it was surplus to requirements, and the site was sold in 2006 to the Welbeck Estate Group who sold the entire site in October 2007.The airfield opened during May 1939 and was used by RAF Bomber Command during the Second World War with the loss of 86 aircraft. The station closed in 1994, though the Ministry of Defence (MoD) retained it as a strategic reserve. Having laid derelict since closure, the MoD elected in 2004 that it was surplus to requirements, and the site was sold in 2006 to the Welbeck Estate Group who sold the entire site in October 2007. Built between 1938 and 1939, RAF West Raynham was an expansion scheme airfield. The grass landing area was aligned roughly north-east to south-west. The main camp, with housing and headquarters, was located immediately west of the landing area. To the south-east were bomb stores. The airfield was originally equipped with a Watch Office with Tower (Fort Type), of pattern 207/36 (made from concrete), although the tower was later removed and new control room built to pattern 4698/43. Later in the war the station was provided with a "Control Tower for Very Heavy Bomber Stations" to pattern 294/45, one of only four such towers to be built.
       
      The Pictures
       
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      Small industrial building
        
       
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      Officer's Mess

       
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      The Bar..

       
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      As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated  
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