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London, Paris & Berlin Track footage

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Various bits of cobbled together footage from exploring metro systems in London and overseas. (The end bit at Aldwych is an in-joke).


There's stuff from New York and skyscrapers and stuff on the account, as well as a trip to North Korea. I rarely film, so not much on there.

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A few bits I recognise on there, doesn't have to be polished it's always nice to see these places from another point of view.

Love the disclaimer at the end :D

Thanks for sharing :-)

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That's pretty cool and I like the soundtrack. I recognise those yellow trains but not sure of the others. Feel free to post the other vids up for nostalgia's sake, I'm sure a few people would appreciate the West Park one on here :D (EDIT) Errmmmm not to mention Male Whale :lol:

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