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Paulpowers

UK Cathedral Arches. Manchester - Nov 2015

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Access into the arches is always a bit sketchy and this time was no different, once inside there's no real chance of being disturbed (other than from pigeons.)

The arches as a location is pretty big but 99% of the population of Manchester are unaware of what lies just below their feet.

The Victoria Arches area series of bricked-up arches built in an embankment of the River Irwell in Manchester. They served as business premises, landing stages for steam packet riverboats and as Second World War air-raid shelters. They were accessed from wooden staircases that descended from Victoria Street.

Regular flooding resulted in the closure of the steam-packet services in the early 20th century, and the arches were later used for general storage. Following the outbreak of the Second World War they were converted into air raid shelters. They are now bricked up and inaccessible, the staircases having been removed in the latter part of the 20th century.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_Arches

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Glad i know you have a sence of humour m8ty. Both vids are good just one got the better tunes lol ......... :band: . On another note do like the history popping up on this damn cool....

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