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UK St John the evangelist Church - DEC 2015

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Hi all a nice new report from me on a recent explore. This is a cracking little church with some awesome stuff still left and very photographic. And seeing has its close to christmas this seems like a good time to do it and post it. Some awesome stuff here like the tower and the bell. In what i coulden't resist to ring hell ive always wantd to have a go. But bloody hell its a lot louder than ya think lol. And that was via a little tap. Anyways met a few people here not to many just 4. So all in all was not to bad was expecting a coach to be here to be honest lol. So went with the missus and she loved every bit of it. It was a great place indeed not sure how much longer she got has wont be long before kids etc start to fook her up but for now shes a stunner. I'm sure you all going to like this one. Picked a cracking day for this has it was the village christmas party. So everone was busy. Can see why its stood the test of youth etc has its in an incredibly viewable place where loads of people can see what ya up to. And homes built right next to it practicaly on the ground lol. Anyways armed with a new camera thx to @ACID-REFLUX off we went. I would also like to add that the climb up the tower is a bitch and bloody narrow. The only shot i seem to have missed is that of the organ. Not to bad a loss has its in semi decent condition not sure how i forgot. Also there is a basement but a fat ass like me cant fit lol. And there is electric and water still on in this place. And has a word of caution in the tower the floors are in an extremely bad way. Major butt tightning.

 

History :

 

St John's was built between 1890 and 1892 to a design by the Lancaster architects Paley, Austin and Paley. The estimated cost of the church was �6,800 but, because of problems with the foundations, its final cost, including the fittings, was nearer to �12,000 (�1,170,000 in 2015). It provided seating for 616 people.Financial donations towards the site and structure of the church were made by Thomas Brooks, 1st Baron Crawshaw of Crawshaw Hall. Because of diminishing numbers attending the church, and because of thefts of lead from the roof of the church, the congregation has decided to opt for the church to be declared redundant. The church was declared redundant on 20 February 2012.

 

The church is constructed in sandstone with Yorkshire stone dressings and is roofed in green Cumberland slate. Its architectural style is Perpendicular.[2] The plan consists of a nave and chancel in one range, north and south aisles, a south transept, and a north transept above which rises a tower. A clerestory rises above the aisles along the length of the nave, to the south of the chancel is a chapel, and to its north is a vestry. There is a porch in the westernmost bay of the south aisle, and another porch in the angle of the south transept.[2][6] On each side of the clerestory are ten square-headed two-light windows. The west window has five lights and contains intersecting tracery. Along the aisles are buttresses and two-light windows. The south transept also has buttresses, and a large five-light window containing Perpendicular and curvilinear tracery. The chancel has a large east window with six lights containing Perpendicular tracery. The tower has diagonal corner buttresses that rise to octagonal turrets surmounted by crocketed pinnacles. The summit of the tower has an embattled parapet.[2]

Interior

The interior of the church is lined with red Rainhill sandstone.[6] The five-bay arcades are carried alternately on round and octagonal columns. The chancel arch is high, and has two orders of moulding. There are carved wooden screens between the nave and the chancel, and between the chancel and the north transept. Some of the choir stalls have elaborately carved crocketed canopies containing statues.[2] The reredos dates from the 20th century, and contains statues of the Four Evangelists. The font is hexagonal. In the church are memorials to members of the Brooks family.[6] Inside the tower, and near to the tower, are carved texts from Psalm 148.[5]

 

The Church of England Commissioners had agreed the sale of the church to a small non trading renewable energy company in 2013. However a planning application was rejected in January 2015, as the plans involved the removal of 80% of the tree's on the site, most of which have Tree Preservation Orders on them. The siting of one 40ft and two 20ft used shipping containers in place of the tree's was also cited by planners the reason for rejecting the scheme.[9][10] As the site has been removed from the Church's list of buildings for sale, its current status is unknown.

 

PICS:

 

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Christmas shots lol

 

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The bell .. It goes DONG loudly lol

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Really pissed at this shot has i really really wanted it. But was major dark and fooking floor moves and shit the shit being bomb diving bloody pidgeons sure these fookers take after an old japanese custom lol. Sorry for blur but give ya idea of it. Atleast the inside bell shot came out ok.

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The tower stairs

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Sorry for pic heavy just so much to shoot. Anways these last 2 are my faves so will say thanks for looking and have a good christmas all.

 

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Merry christmas have a great time and thanks for looking at the stunning church.

 

 

 

 

Edited by Dubbed Navigator
Editing photo bucket links

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Thx for nice replies. Yea lots of really nice pictures to be had here thx to the many items still left inside. It's got some great charm this one has. Your comments are apreciated so many thanks 

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Thanks jones m8ty. Yea managed some good shots in here. Cant wait to go back for some more and see if out changed .. Know some more statues have turned up allready.

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Thx all and lol love the comments. It's a really nice place to photograph. And so would love to see a priest people shot in that throne type chair epic lol 

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