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Royal Hospital Haslar - Gosport - Hampshire - January 2014

TrevBish.co.uk

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After a few failed attempts over the past year. I saw online that it was becoming popular again, so I thought I would give it a try again. This time with no problems. Spent 7 hours inside here. Didn't see anyone else. We saw fresh footprints on the floor that didn't match any of our footwear, then noticed a few doors being sealed up that weren't the first time around? strange! Any way, here are my pictures. Nothing new, just the same stuff! A couple are a slight HDR but nothing eye burning! Hope you like.

Founded in the reign of King George I, the Royal Hospital Haslar in Gosport, Hampshire, was one of several hospitals serving the Portsmouth Urban Area, but had previously been the country's foremost – and ultimately last – military hospital. Its military status was withdrawn in 2007, and those military personnel remaining joined the Ministry of Defence Hospital Unit (MDHU Portsmouth) at Queen Alexandra Hospital in Cosham, Portsmouth. In the summer of 2009, all remaining (civilian) medical services at Haslar were relocated to the Queen Alexandra Hospital, and the site was subsequently sold.

The Royal Military Hospital Haslar had a number of notable specialist medical facilities, including a decompression chamber and a zymotic isolation ward.

History[edit]

The Royal Hospital Haslar was designed by Theodore Jacobsen and built between 1746–61. The site opened as a Royal Navy hospital in 1753. It has had a very long and distinguished history in the medical care of service personnel both in peacetime and in war since that time, treating many tens of thousands of patients.

Haslar was the biggest hospital – and the largest brick building – in England when it was constructed. Dr James Lind (1716–1794), a leading physician at Haslar from 1758 till 1785, played a major part in discovering a cure for scurvy, not least through his pioneering use of a double blind methodology with Vitamin C supplements (limes). The hospital included an asylum for sailors with psychiatric disorders, and an early superintending psychiatrist was the phrenologist, Dr James Scott (1785–1859), a member of the influential Edinburgh Phrenological Society.

In 1902 the hospital became known as the Royal Naval Hospital Haslar (abbreviated to RNH Haslar).

In the 1940s, RNH Haslar set up the country's first blood bank to treat wounded soldiers from the Second World War.

In 1966, the remit of the hospital expanded to serve all three services – the Royal Navy, Army and Royal Air Force, after which time, it became known as the Royal Military Hospital Haslar.

In 1996 the hospital again became known as the Royal Hospital Haslar.

In 2001, the provision of acute healthcare within Royal Hospital Haslar was transferred from the Defence Secondary Care Agency to the NHS Trust. The Royal Hospital was the last MOD-owned acute hospital in the UK. The decision to end the provision of bespoke hospital care for Service personnel was taken prior to the UK's expeditionary campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan, but was nevertheless followed through, largely on the grounds of cost. The change from military control to the NHS, and the complete closure of the hospital have remained the subject of considerable local controversy.

The hospital formally closed in 2009 and the site has since started to be redeveloped.



























PLEASE LOOK UP AND SEE THE TRAM LINES:^

The Haslar Tramway was constructed in 1877 as a single line running from the Haslar Jetty into the Main Arcade of the hospital. At the jetty there was an ambulance shed with a junction for the storage of the ambulance tram and a similar junction at the Arcade. The two trams were built by the London and Midland Railway.

Hospital boats or cutters collected the sick, wounded or dead from the anchoring fleet at Spithead and the dockyard and ferried them to the Haslar Jetty. On arrival at the jetty the patients were landed and transferred to the ambulance. Sick Berth staff then pushed the ambulance to the Main Arcade.

On arrival at the Arcade the patients were then carried to the hospital receiving room for admission.















Thank You!

 

Silent Night

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lovely place this, bloody good report cool write up and sooo much to shoot great choice of shots mate thumbs up here (y)

 

Lara

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Oh that is a nice report on her, she is a special place indeed. Stunning shots, thanks for sharing :)

 

skeleton key

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Very Nice and covered the place really well buddy

What a cracking wander (y)

 

klempner69

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I must say,you have done a damn good job shooting this place.Any exteriors or is it cnut to take because of Seccas?

 

HitGirl

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What twat left their tripod in pic 4 lol bet it was Matt haha

Nice report Trev xxx

 

bucksmadhouse

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Amazing pictures....can't imagine it will stay in that condition for long. Well worth an explore

 
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