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Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/14/2018 in all areas

  1. 6 points
    Originally opened in 1833 as Connaght District Lunatic Asylum, later changing its name. I found a very interesting write up on the below link, which is where I copied this - It was intended for the care of ‘curable lunatics’ and opened in a spirit of optimism with regard to its progressive role in public health. Its history, however, is one of continual struggle: to prevent the admission of unsuitable cases, to secure additional funding and to offer reasonable standards of care under difficult conditions. In common with the majority of other District Asylums, the CDLA was continually overcrowded, housing in November 1900, for example, 1,165 patients in accommodation designed to hold 840. https://www.historyireland.com/18th-19th-century-history/tales-from-the-big-house-the-connacht-district-lunatic-asylum-in-the-late-nineteenth-century/ Exactly a year ago I went over to Ireland with pretty much just 2 locations I was desperately keen to visit. After failing to find any access at the first (another asylum) I drove west. It was a lovely bright, autumnal day and eventually I found myself inside. All was fine for 10-15 minutes until I turned round to find myself face-to-face with a gentleman who I guess was a caretaker of sorts. I hadn't heard him make any noise to alert me he was there and so I was in a mild state of shock! He told me that there had been some recent vandalism but after a few minutes of chatting I managed to persuade him not to evict me or alert the authorities. For that I was incredibly grateful. Here is my collection (a bit corridor-heavy)
  2. 5 points
    Had a look in here earlier in the year after an fail near by. A grand example of dereliction on the outside and a crumbing mess on the inside. Nice little wander as it turned out. There is enough features and bits still knocking about to make it interesting and I enjoyed having a look around and getting some snaps. Visited with non member Paul. History The Crown opened in 1899 as the Lyceum Theatre. The intention was to provide a luxury theatre for Shakespeare productions and drama as well as revue. It is a landmark building in the town of Eccles in a vaguely Elizabethan Style with pilasters and mullioned windows. The facade is constructed of moulded red brick of five storeys with terracotta dressings to three high arched windows at first floor. It is richly decorated, and has an asymmetrically placed short corner tower. This once had a pyramidal roof and the parapet was topped with square pinnacles. The cast iron copy still survives, now encased. The auditorium was designed with three balconies, supported by four columns. The ornamentation of the proscenium comprised an allegorical representation of Shakespeare's 'Seven Ages of Man'. The act drop was a facsimile of Beverley's noted work for the opening of the Theatre Royal (Manchester) in 1845 - a Grecian subject painted by Mr Keith. Becoming a cinema in 1932, it was later adapted for Cinemascope, ending stage use. Converted for bingo in 1963, by the late 1980s it was reported to be falling into disrepair internally. The exterior is largely intact, apart from the stage house which has been partly demolished. Planning permission was given in 2005 - and again in 2008 - for partial demolition (retaining the facade) and development of apartments behind. Since then the building has become more dilapidated and a new planning application for a residential and retail development submitted in 2016 proposes complete demolition of the theatre. . Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157693704356862/with/42124774351/
  3. 5 points
    Not a bad little mooch this one. Quite a lot of area to cover with most of it being stripped unfortunately but, there is still stuff to see and some nice decay in parts. It seems the building was used to make carpet underlay form 2002 until 2013. I guess its been abandoned since then. Visited with non member Paul. History The Arrol-Johnston Motor Co., which had been in operation since 1896, opened its Dumfries factory at Heathhall in July 1913. The manager, Thomas Charles Pullinger, had been inspired by the Albert Kahn designed factories of Henry Ford in America. Kahn provided the design for the Dumfries factory, and it bears more than a passing resemblance to Ford's Highland Park factory in Detroit. The Heathhall factory was said to be the most advanced light engineering factory of its day in Scotland. The site was purchased by the North British Rubber Company in 1946. It then became Uniroyal Ltd in the 60's, and in 1987 changed yet again to the British subsidiary of the Gates Rubber Company. It has been known as Interfloor since 2002. . Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flicker page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157670753473708/with/43157314391/
  4. 4 points
    In the forest sits this stone building, I can't find any info on it other that it's sitting on a settlement mound. Video.. https://youtu.be/nGuRNOeRuA8
  5. 4 points
    This is from a exploration on the 13th of May, 2013. These pictures are mostly the east buildings from the interior. Second set will be south end and my favorites, the roof. Brach’s Candy was a Chicago (and world) candy factory legend. This facility, one of the largest candy factories in the world, was mostly built in 1921-23 and then partially rebuilt in 1948 after a tragic fire and explosion killed 11 employees. At its peak, the facility was over 2,200,000 sq feet (670,560 meters) and had 2,400 workers. Typical vulture capitalism in the 1980’s into the 2000’s destroyed the company and this facility closed the doors to workers in 2003. One of the office buildings was blown up for the movie Dark Knight in 2007. Due to much of the west complex being gang occupied and the neighborhood sporadically violent, I chose the last cold day of that spring to visit, on Mother’s Day, a very big holiday in the USA, figuring even gangbangers might take an afternoon off to visit their mums 🙂 So I got there mid-afternoon and only left as it was getting too dark to see much, let alone photograph. I tried to go back one more time, but it was not possible to access, and within weeks it was in the process of being wrecked. For the USA, it had more interior metal than many buildings I've been in, which usually have been picked clean by scrappers, which gave it a nice ambiance. Overall, it was a very dark location, due to most windows being bricked up and it was late in the day when I visited, but what light I had was beautiful. The last pic in this set shows downtown Chicago in the distance. I'll post set two in a week or two, then start digging through files for other past and recent explorations. Many thanks to everyone who welcomed me on the introduction board. Thanks to all who share, some really amazing reports here, and looking forward to looking around more, but figured I should share something for starters 🙂 Staklo
  6. 4 points
    Lenston, Thanks for being the first to welcome me. I pretty much winged it on file size, text and quantity of pics for first report, so let me know if I screwed anything up 🙂 Hamtagger, thanks 🙂 Coolboyslim, you got your first USA post from me up and live, lots more from here and Eastern Bloc locations as time allows 🙂 Hey The_Raw, thanks for the welcome +1 back at ya for your great posts, I think is was one your reports that brought me here in the first place 🙂
  7. 3 points
    I had been waiting to do this one for a month or so; but simply hadn't found the time to hop on the M40 and up to Brum. It was a good opportunity to meet up with some explorers whom I have been chatting to for the best part of ten years or so and do an explore at the same time! We arrived here mid morning one Sunday and once inside; the beauty of the place was revealed! I really loved this place. Again though; it was full of the new age era of explorers; about a dozen of them, some videoing and some just shooting photos. It's rare you bump into a person on explores, but lately its been every explore. This one was flavour of the month back in the summer though!! After the explore, we went to Costco for a cheap lunch in the canteen there and had a nice, chilled drive around the local area looking for other sites The Hall, built between 1903 and 1904 by architects Ewan Harper and James Harper and the terracotta was made by Gibbs and Canning ltd of Tamworth, is situated at the northern end of Corporation Street in Birmingham. The hall is a 3 storey red brick and terracotta building with Grade II Listing on it, with 2000 seats in the main halll over 30 additional rooms including 3 school halls. By 1991, the building had been converted into a nightclub which closed in 2002, but reopened as the Q Club in 2007. This club's last event at the premises was "Flashback" in 2011. During its time as a Night Club 3 deaths were reported. -A punter jumped off the tower in 1998 -A clubber OD'd in 2000 -A stabbing outside in 2008. The Club reopened in 2012, but closed in 2016. In 2018; Birmingham city council granted planning permission to convert it into a 147 room hotel costing £35 million. Works have begun and are expected to be complete by 2020. I just love the contrast between old and new here; with the older Methodists Hall and the big, modern buildings springing up around it. There is a live part of the building and as we were there, a Gospel Band were practicing literally behind the wall; a strong scent of Jerk Chicken was filling the rooms of the abandoned part. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 Thanks for Looking, more of the Hall at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157674880523028
  8. 3 points
    Tskaltubo was a popular spa resort, famous for its healing mineral waters and radon bath treatments. The first sanatoriums with in-patient facilities were built in 1925 and in 1931 Tskaltubo was designated as a spa resort by the Soviet government. Under the communist regime, a spa break was a prescribed, and mostly compulsory, annual respite, as the “right to rest” was inscribed in the Russian constitution. A visit to the doctors could result in being dispatched to somewhere like Lithuania or Georgia where spa towns were renowned for the healing properties of their mineral waters. It was one of Stalin’s favourite vacation spots. During WWII, the hotels were used as hospitals but after the war, their popularity increased and by the 1980s Tskaltubo was one of the most sought-after tourist destinations in the Soviet Union. Georgia’s independence in 1991 and the fall of the Soviet Union in late December 1991, signalled the collapse of Tskaltubo’s spa industry. Without guests, most of the hotels and resorts were forced to close their doors. Today many of them are home to refugees who fled the conflict in Abkhazia in 92/93 and needed to be rehoused. This one however has been fenced off and remains empty behind a fence with 24 hour security patrols. Apparently it was bought by a local millionaire who has plans to turn it into a luxury hotel although those plans appear to have stalled. I was a bit nervous about this one as we'd seen security the night before and they looked like regular police. The signs on the fence suggested they were 'security police' and their website claims they operate under the control of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Georgia. We very nearly had a run in with one of them patrolling but managed to make a quick getaway thankfully. I really enjoyed it in here. We'd not seen any internal pictures so it was a proper treat to discover what was inside. The theatre was absolutely stunning. Visited with Elliot5200 on what was a great trip to a fascinating country! Thanks for looking.
  9. 3 points
    Part II of the location
  10. 2 points
    Whilst in Leeds with @Hydro3xploric and @Butters we came across a old office building which had recently been kitted out with a full set of scaffolding due to a cool £1.5m investment by JM Construction who intend on converting the vacant 5 storey city center office building into 60 residential 1 and 2 bedroom apartments. Spotting a alarm box flashing at the bottom we chanced it and a few minutes later we was staring at the skyline of central Leeds from a perspective we hadn't seen before. I don't know what it is about city's and rooftops but they are always brilliant places to sit back and chill for a moment or two. The building joined onto this is Called Crispin Lofts and is apparently partially owned by Mel B! I wanted to try getting around to the front but this meant sneaking by a living room window and not wanting to disrupt Scary Spice I grabbed a quick one and retreated External grabbed from google (Crispin Lofts on the left and the roof we was on to the right) And a few more from a roof we spotted just over the road ] Cheers for looking
  11. 2 points
    So back in August (yes I'm slow as ever!); a non-explorer friend and myself visited The Springs in Wallingford, which at the time was a bit of a local tourist trap; but it was an afternoon out! It had really dawned on me at this point which way this hobby is going these days. No word of a lie; there was at least 15 people in that hotel, all this new wave of "YouTube Explorer" we all have our opinions of. They were all nice enough there and then, but a couple were very, very loud and had small children with them. Inevitably, a member of staff of the live Golf Course this was on came and flushed everyone out, myself and my friend sat in an old en-suite upstairs and waited for it to die down. After that; we explored for an hour and a half or so; not much to see here, fairly plain, but it was an enjoyable day out. Upon exit the same Golf Course Staff found us, but were polite and we were on our way. The original build dates back to 1874; a Mock Tudor Style building, this Victorian Villa has been massively altered and extended from the original. Rock Star Ian Gillan of Deep Purple, purchased the villa in 1973 and was behind its and installed a guitar shaped swimming pool in the grounds behind the building before its later conversion into a 32 bedroom hotel. The last owners bought the hotel in 1995 and added a large golf course and club to the grounds. The Springs finally closed in 2014 after the owners could no longer afford the vast upkeep. The Golf Club however; voted one of the best in Oxfordshire is still open. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 As Always Guys, Thank You. More Hotel At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157674868589418
  12. 2 points
    Thanks for taking a look. The decade just before the Great Depression (which was kicked off by the stock market crash of 1929) saw some amazing buildings in this country, especially this city. Over engineered massive structures with amazing terra-cotta and brick work details. I’ll post more facade pics with next set. And glad you liked the shots 🙂 Yep, thanks, better than many and not stripped of everything like some👍 Massive is (was) correct! Several square city blocks with both passengers and freight train access. Sadly all gone now🙁 Hey, nice find! Yes looks like it for sure you can see on the left some of the main buildings brickwork and also elevated train in the background. There was a no-mans land concrete slab to the west side that was probably where the exploded building was.
  13. 2 points
    The company was established in 1949 , they relocated in 2015 to a more central location and just left the site , there is a small petrol station at the front consisting of two bungalows , one is fairly empty and the other is full of paperwork from the petrol sales , not a huge ammount left in the factory but a fair bit of office stuff laying round and a few work stations , decaying nicely in a few places on with the pics from my visit thanks for looking
  14. 1 point
    Been waiting all week to go here only to find it's all been boarded back . so just some from the outside.☹️
  15. 1 point
    Tkvarcelli was an important coal mining town in the war torn region of Abkhazia, a de facto independent republic which remains internationally recognised as part of Georgia. During the Abkhazian war (from 1992 to 93), Tkvarcheli withstood, through Russian humanitarian and military aid, an uneasy siege by the Georgian forces. As a result of the war the town's industries all but stopped and its population has since decreased from approximately 22,000 to just 5,000 people. Abkhazia is on the list of places where the FCO (Foreign & Commonwealth Office) advises against all travel. There is no UK consulate support if anything goes wrong so if you were to lose your passport for example, you'd be pretty fucked. With that in mind, and having read a few horror stories of tourists being aggressively robbed around Tkvarcelli, we were pretty skeptical about coming here. Thanks to some advice from @Olkka, who visited earlier in the year, we chose to hire a driver who knew the area well and we didn't encounter any problems. Top tip of the day - take a bottle of vodka for the guys demolishing the power plant and you'll be reet. Tkvarcelli power plant has seen better days. On the upper levels there were holes in the floor everywhere, hidden by overgrown plants and moss. We tried to be extra careful although it was difficult to tell if any structure we were standing on was safe. There were workers actively demolishing the roof above one end of the plant as well so we had to stick to the opposite end. Thankfully that's where all the good stuff was. The only other obstacle was the squatters but they didn't seem to mind us being there. Workers were sporadically dropping huge sections of roof onto the ground from above Much has been dismantled The Squatters Manoeuvring around this building was so sketchy These stairs were clinging on by dear life. We went up these but the stairs above were completely mangled Nope Coal conveyor chute Control Room. Pretty battered but I loved it in here The central turbine. I may have got a bit carried away photographing this. It would be amazing to have seen this in its hey day. Akarmara was a nearby mining town. Wars and economic change have emptied the town of the 5,000 people who lived there in the 1970s leaving it pretty much a ghost town. Now it is estimated only 35 people remain. It's completely cut off except for a rocky road full of potholes that takes around an hour to navigate. On our arrival we were greeted by some strange looks from the elderly locals, although the local children seemed fascinated by us and one accompanied us for our whole time there. It's a very surreal place where buildings that have a light outside signify that they are lived in. This is to ward off any looters. None of the buildings look lived in otherwise as they are all falling apart. The train station has been completely reclaimed by the forest. This building was completely trashed except for one flat in the middle inhabited by a young family. Thanks for looking.
  16. 1 point
    HMP Holloway was the largest women’s only prison in Europe until its closure in 2016. Rebuilt between 1971 to 1985, the prison's design was intended to produce an atmosphere more like a hospital than a prison. This design was recognised as a failure in the 1980s as its lack of traditional wings or landings, and a maze of corridors, means warders had difficulty monitoring inmates. Entrance to the rebuilt prison (CC Licence) The history of Holloway dates back to 1852 when the original prison opened as a mixed-sex establishment, but due to the increasing demand for space for female prisoners, it became female-only in 1903. Inmates of the original prison included Oscar Wilde, and more recently Moors murderess Myra Hindley from 1966. The original Holloway Prison (public domain image) Holding female adults and young offenders either sentenced by the courts or being held on remand, the prison consisted mostly of single cells, but there was also various dormitory accommodation. In January 2016 an inquest into the death of Sarah Reed, a paranoid schizophrenic being held on remand, identified failings in the care system. The prison was closed in July 2016, with plans for it to be sold for housing. Time to start the unofficial tour.... Wandering between the modern buildings within the prison grounds Let's head straight into the cells... Dorm room Single prisoner cell Another dorm room Mural in one of the many winding corridors Twin room Lots of peely paint in some places There were several styles of cell Entrance into the prison... Prisoner transport vehicles would park inside this area, and the gates closed behind them The front entrance leads into this area, with a command room behind the glass Corridors lead into the prison Each area separated by iron gates Prisoner amenities and facilities Entrance into the "family friendly" visitor centre. Visitors and prisoners could be kept separated in these divided rooms The prison had a swimming pool for prisoners to use And gym facilities The glazed walkway was decorated by inmates The prison had a medical ward, including its own opticians Pharmacy Covered walkway leading to the chapel. Note the high-security walls The chapel was large but pretty basic More inmate artwork Mural inside one of the rooms A room for presentations The prison's boiler house Exterior of the buildings within the prison walls High fences divided the exterior areas
  17. 1 point
    This place looks incredible, sad to see the mirror has been smashed though Brilliant report and nicely covered!
  18. 1 point
    Well finally onto our last explore of the night last night, myself, woody and two others went on to do this one, after a long day and night exploring this was 4th on our list for the day/night, been wanting too see this section for a long time so to finally see it made us more than happy and we all came out with a big smile on our faces, apart from the chalk grafitti its very nice down there and harldy any litter etc. bit wet in places but thats to be expected with all the rain we've had the last few months. i wont bore you with the info as theirs so much of it about and been posted before but heres a few pics i took and i hope they show just what a lovely place it is :-).
  19. 1 point
    Hey! I'm Solixio, feel free to call me Sol, I joined looking for places to explore near me, in Spokane. If you have places I'd love to know where or what they're like, I'm becoming very fascinated with Urban Exploration, any information is welcomed and appreciated! 😁
  20. 1 point
    Welcome along mate.... +1 for seeing more American reports
  21. 1 point
    I see another football has appeared since I went! Really nice report there. Very thorough, I'm especially liking the ceiling shot.
  22. 1 point
    A couple of years ago this was a factory to repair trains. Now the factory is closed but the are still a lot of thinks to see.
  23. 1 point
    We went to this really impressed location. The security there is very high and some people said it is impossible to get in. We made it without any problems.
  24. 1 point
    Nice one, great set of pics. As it appears to be open again I should get my backside down there really before someone puts a lock on it again.
  25. 1 point
    Those photos are spot on! Really like them
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