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  1. 8 points
    A strange place, fake as f*** , but awesome to see and wander around
  2. 7 points
    The hospital first opened in October 1889 as the Free Hospital for Women and Children. In 1903 children ceased to be treated and in 1904 it became the Samaritan Free Hospital for Women. It had 88 beds in two sections; the surgical side with 11 wards of two beds each and 3 larger convalescent wards, and the medical side with 5 wards and a smaller one used as a theatre. By the beginning of the 20th century the Samaritan Free Hospital, despite its small size, had become one of the country's most important gynaecological hospitals. During WW2 the Hospital joined the Emergency Medical Service with 103 beds. In 1948 the Hospital joined the National Health Service, becoming affiliated with St Mary's Hospital. It was renamed the Samaritan Hospital for Women and served under the NHS until its closure in 1997. Abandoned for over twenty years and with a lush exterior it's a shame there isn't more to see in here but it's still pretty interesting. A nice tiled staircase is the only redeeming architectural feature but it's nice enough to give the building some charm. The canteen is still recognisable but most rooms have been cleared out. The most interesting artefacts are down in the basement. There is a box of what are presumably human bones that was hidden in a forgotten incineration bag. A spinal column casually sitting on a shelf in the stationary room, and paperwork dating back as far as the 1930s. Worth mentioning that it is completely riddled with exposed asbestos piping down there. Do we care? Nah. Probably should though! Thanks for looking
  3. 6 points
    I visited this little cemetery a few times in the last years cause it's not far from my home town. It is nothing unique but in the early daylight or the late evening light the atmosphere is fine. The pictures I made there before were not that bad but also not that special. This time it changed. We created a very special atmosphere with some artificial fog. This was only possible cause this day there was absolutely no wind. I really like the result, what do you think? 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10
  4. 6 points
    So this is my last post from RAF Coltishall.. this was the officers mess which is situated just out off the main area. Its a standard H block design which is common in most RAF accommodation blocks. the wings are used for an upstairs and downstairs accommodation. Similar to the sergeants mess it has a new three storey block built on too it with an interconnecting corridor. These blocks are quite plush with nice lights and some funky carpets. this is prob one off the last used mess halls in the country now. So its in reasonable condition. Made a few visits too this block from 2017 to late last year. The standard three bay arched door. Similar too that at Raynham and Upwood. The kitchen areas are quite extensive. Restroom areas with special coat hangers. In one off the rooms is some nice artwork by the servicemen. The newer block was a bit more bland with repetitive rooms. In the basement off the main block is a little room, this has been converted into a small social club. Before the days of health and safety, there was more nice artwork on the walls.shame it was pitch black down here.
  5. 5 points
    Last week I tried to go to Antwerp metro to take pictures of the tunnels, but the mission was fucked up, because one of the guys opened an emergency door as he wanted to see how alarm works... I only took one good picture by that moment and cannot express how strongly I was pissed off with this... A few days later, I decided to go there again, this time alone. So, I put on my red exploring dress, took my camera and went down to the tunnels. I walked the line 8/10 towards Opera, crossed a few active and abandoned stations without any problems. At some abandoned stations, when you walk in, something starts ringing, like an alarm, but I disregarded it, and in half a minute it stopped making noise itself. At 4am I crossed the Opera station construction site. Wanted to change the line, but there were people working, I heard noise and sound of steps. No idea why would they start work so early, but I decided not to socialise and left the system.
  6. 4 points
    First report on here, or anywhere, in ages hope you all enjoy it. Been wanting to see inside this place for years, had a failed attempt a few years back but a recent fire and the property being bought last year worked to our advantage. Visited with my partner who has also tried & been caught by security so we were both pleased to gain access & finally get to have a look around the place. A bit of a shell in parts due to the fire & school holidays but still plenty to see & well wort the effort ☺️ History, stolen from www.culturevannin.im In 1892 the Liverpool Marine Biological Committee set up a base in two small buildings on Port Erin Bay; much of their work involved dredging excursions in the Irish Sea. The growing numbers of visiting naturalists and vacation classes began to ‘swamp’ these small buildings and in 1902 activities were relocated to bigger premises in the south-west corner of Port Erin Bay. In 1919 the University of Liverpool took control and ownership of the Marine Biological Station, and students studied Marine Biology there for a number of years. The last admission of students from the University of Liverpool was in Autumn 2005. The station closed in October 2006. The building fell victim to an arson attack on New Years Eve 2016 😠 The propery has been bought for £500,000 by Delgatie Ltd in 2018, which plan to replace the existing buildings with a mixed use development including residential, retail and commercial.
  7. 4 points
    Hello everyone, I am an explorer from Czech republic, yet I mostly go exploring in Italy and in France. Personally I love small villas, mansions, hospitals and religious sites which is the reason why I explore abroad, as in my coutry we mostly have industrial sites Hoping to meet some fellow explorers!
  8. 4 points
    In the middle of the woods, they appear all of a sudden: giant walls and ruins as well as holes hidden beneath branchwood and covered by foliage - the remnants of an old shooting range of the German Wehrmacht (the armed forces of Nazi-Germany). Even the soil itself is still cotaminated by bullets and casings. The remains can be identified as ammunition from the Wehrmacht as well as from the Bundeswehr and the US-Army, which prove that all of these three armies used the area for their shooting exercises. Unfortunately, I haven´t come across confirmed historical sources concerning the former shooting range, but it seems to be obvious that the area was a shooting range built by the Wehrmacht. Not confirmed sources indicate that the US-Americans blasted the buildings after World War II. After the destruction the area was apparently still used for military exercises on occasion. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  9. 4 points
    History The Art Deco cinema was designed for the Union Cinema Circuit by renowned architects Verity and Beverley. It opened on 23rd July 1937 but was shortly taken over by ABC (Associated British Cinemas) in October that year. It became a Ritz in the 60’s and was used as a cinema up until it’s closure on 18th June 1984 when it was taken over as a bingo hall until that then closed in 2008. Grade II listed due to it’s highly decorative interior of an Art Deco, Neo-Egyptian and Chinoiserie inspired decoration. Which of very few survive now. Here’s a pretty cool video I’ve linked from Youtube with some cracking old images of the place along with a recording of the Compton Organ being played there. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-Ej2LEqDEQ Our Visit I’d seen @AndyK and @Spidermonkey had been here a few weeks back, followed by @dweebs report also, so with the 28 meet being in Brum it was the perfect opportunity to get over and have a look. Pretty straight forward as it seems it had quite a bit of traffic earlier in the week to which I noticed the lights were on. Which is ideal as it’s a pain in the arse light painting these massive auditoriums. Visited with @ferret, @drew howe and @slayaaa. Not too much left from it’s cinema days but still a good un non the less. Pics I’ve included a couple of old photos dragged up from Google and a couple of screengrabs of the above mentioned video for comparison. Starting with some externals Foyer Moving onto the auditorium Some old graffiti behind the stage/screen area A lot of money for it’s day this, and still now to be fair. I certainly wouldn’t mind winning that. Original seating, covered in cobwebs. and to finish on “The shot”
  10. 4 points
    A trip through an abandoned pig slaughterhouse. Here you can follow the last path of a pig. 1 round them up IMG_1974-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 dead pig walking IMG_1990-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 shocking IMG_1994-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 beginning of processing IMG_1929-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 5 cleaning IMG_1922-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 hair trim IMG_1927-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 hair removing IMG_1973 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 8 waist disposal IMG_1967-Edit-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 9 chop them up IMG_1915-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 10 piece by piece IMG_1920-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 11 meat chain IMG_1961-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 12 to the freezer IMG_1938-HDR-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  11. 4 points
    I’d had my eye on this place for years. I’m from Prestwich so only up the road and I remember going past the Rialto further up where there is now a maccies and past this place on our way into town as a kid. I lived in Broughton briefly about 5 years ago and used to keep an eye on it, however it was always well sealed. Visited with @EOA initially and @Host and @CameraShy joined us later. History Built in 1899 by the Broughton Theatres Syndicate Ltd, Victoria Theatre opened in December 1900. Less than a year after opening it was used as a cinema (although sadly there is no signs of cinema use left) Seating was extended from 2,000 upto 3,000 in 1910 and between 1919 and 1919 it was used as a theatre again. It was then used as a cinema again until it closed in 1958 when it was then used as a clothing/furniture store until 1973 when it was an unsuccessful bingo hall, which closed shortly after. It remained closed until the 80s when it opened up as Bingo hall, which it remained until its closure in 2008 under the Palace name. Its Grade II listed and on the theatres at risk register. More info can be found here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_Theatre,_Salford http://www.arthurlloyd.co.uk/SalfordTheatres.htm#victoria https://salfordvictoria.co.uk/ Pics Ill start with some old pictures of the theatre taken from google image search or the above websites. and now not too sure on the date of this Now, looking out from the stage Looking down at the stage bad lens flare The upper circle seating area which has been boarded off seating on the dress circle looking down from the dress circle spiderwebs and pigeon shit fill the upper levels. Looking up from the dress circle level to the awesome ceiling. the stalls/stage level more spider webby goodness above one of the boxes next to the stage the back of the curved plaster ceiling above the stage stripped seating in a back room the upper circle boarded off The stage level cheap Down into the basement and underneath eh stage underneath the stage. The wooden levers you can see operated various trapdoors and other stage type thingamabobs. Which is pretty cool. small workshop area Nice tilling Main entrance bingo at its best!
  12. 4 points
    History: A blast furnace is an installation that makes steel from iron ore and coke, this happens at a temperature of around 2400 degrees Celsius. When there is quick liquid in the oven, one is drilled open and the steel flows out Steel production and further activities in this area stopped in 2011. Which brings an end to the more than 200-year-old steel production in Liège HFB by Hooismans, on Flickr Blast Furnace by Hooismans, on Flickr Blast Furnace by Hooismans, on Flickr HFB by Hooismans, on Flickr Laboratory by Hooismans, on Flickr Laboratory by Hooismans, on Flickr The house by Hooismans, on Flickr I also made a documentary on this place where i tell about the history of this place and how this factory worked in his heyday It is in dutch but it has subtitles Thanks for looking through!
  13. 4 points
    History This coal mine was established in 1910 and was funded by the Prussian empire. This facility contained two elevator towers. In 1912 the construction began on a cokes plant right next to the coal mine. In 1943 the mine shut down due to the second world war, after 6 years the mine reopened again. With this reopening there was also a major renovation, with this renovation there was a larger modern elevator added to the facility. In 1998 the facility was bought by a big coal mining corporation which owned 5 other coal mines. In 2008 the 98 year old coal mining facility was closed down by the government. The historic part is currently being restored and the part that was renovated after the war will probably be torn down. Explore when we got in we first went trough a whole system with conveyer belts, after that we ended up in the huge coal washery. after we explored this part we went up into the elevator tower. The tower was 10 floors high so we were quite tired then we were on the tower but it was really worth it, in the tower there was an enormous electrical lift motor which was really nice to take pictures from. It was a really cool place to explore, I really enjoyed it! I also made a documentary about this place, the video is down below this post (it is in Dutch, but it has english subtitles) Here is the video i made on this place
  14. 4 points
    Hidden in central Italy, this beautifull villa stands still in a huge overgrown garden. There is not much information about it. Originally it seems to have been built for a noble family, later was enlarged and served also for guests. During the war period the house witnessed a horrible massacre carried by German troops, that resulted in shooting of almost 40 civilians in its gardens. Garden is now so full of greenery that from far away you can hardly see the house. And even when standing very close to it, from the outside it actually seems pretty repelling. After going through the shed and after passing thru first very trashed room, you get to see beautifull room with golden wallpaper, beatifull sofa a iconic two mirrors, that gave the villa its name. From the materials left in the house, one can assume it has been abandoned for over 20 years. On some papers from social services are stated the names of its last owners, probably one of them was a doctor. If you look very carefully in one of the bedrooms, you can even locate their photos. Even thou it has been vandalized lately, there are still some personal items, apart from the photos of the owners you can also find teeth prostethics, suitcase, some pieces of clothing and tons of books.
  15. 4 points
    A few pictures from my recent trip to Stuttgart. Right before going to metro, already at the entrance of the tunnel, I recalled that this night the clock is being changed to summer time, so we have one hour less for exploring. Oh... Well, let's go anyway. We walked a few hundred meters and started taking pictures near an emergency exit. The first train was supposed to pass shortly after 4am. Around 3:55, we turned on lights in the tunnel, knowing that the metro service will soon send someone to check what the hell is going on there. The plan was to stay just a few minutes more, take a couple of pictures and leave, but all of a sudden I heard my friend shouting Oh, shit!!! I turned back and saw a train... The first train which for unknown reason appeared earlier than scheduled... Can't say who was more surprised, we or the driver, who immediately used emergency brakes We grabbed our stuff and ran towards the nearest emergency exit. On the street, we hided our sdcards in case if police stops us, but everything was fine. They didn't even stop the traffic. The last picture was taken some 30 sec before this all happened First 3 pictures are from S Bahn tunnels which we did the next day.
  16. 3 points
    I discovered this big factory almost 2 years ago. It used to build washing machines and it was closed down more than 10 years ago. At that time it was already obvious that the location was completely empty... but what made me really interested in this place was the colour of some building of the complex: that very particular red, which almost seems like blood, was enough to make me say "I need to go there". And so I did. As I guessed, there was nothing inside lol, but I don't regret this exploration at all... Btw this place is a little bit tricky because it's completely surrounded by houses, so everyone can see you. We had to hide in various occasion: one time there was a watch dog who was barking to us from his home so we hid ourselves behind a wall, just 2 meters away from it. Luckily its owners didn't get why that dog was barking that much. At some point an old lady and her husband saw us but in the end nothing happened... Here is the complete album: https://flic.kr/s/aHskSXJdtA
  17. 3 points
    History Tullis Russell was formed in 1809 by Robert Tullis, he acquired Rothes mill in 1836. In 1912 the construction of Markinch Power Station began, to provide the mill with electrical power, rather than power provided from water wheel. The Coal Fired Power Station was completed in 1914, and was fitted with 3 Parsons Units and Rerolle electrical equipment. At some point, I have no definite date, but the power station was extended to take a fourth slightly larger, more modern Parsons unit along with an English Electric system to distribute the power it generated. It was also given an oil fired system to work alongside the coal fired boilers. Sadly, the plant was deemed too dirty after breeching EU emission regulations and was forced to close been replaced by the new biomass plant on site. For a mothballed site though, it's still very much live, all the power is still on and the readouts in the control room as still showing live stats for the power station. It wouldn't take much to raise steam and get her running again! Explore One that i've been meaning to do for a couple of years having seen some seriously epic report on the place it sadly never happened with it being so far away. Big mistake by myself as always, as you will see. Visited with @GK_WAX it was a good day out and good to finally see it. Didn't manage to get any more photo's as we planned to get the boiler house and other bits done on the way out but got collared by a worker in there stripping the turbines We hid behind a switchboard for about 40 minutes with no where to go. The only possible way out was where he came from or back through the small window he was boarding back up. Luckily he was a sound guy and we had a natter about the place before he escorted us out. The metal fairies had been in before Christmas and it seems this has kicked the demo team up the arse to press on. It won't have long left, access was a bit of a faff due to the amount of chomping and concrete rubble blocking everything. Pics A sorry sight to behold indeed
  18. 3 points
    Visited as the second site on mine and @Mooksters first Northern Road Trip of the year. We had failed several sites that day, and the day was coming to a rather murky and rainy end; but before we plumbed the hotel in for the night; we went to this short, sweet and rather destroyed church; the lone survivor of its time, sitting on its lonesome behind a Costa Coffee Drive Through and opposite a Travelodge Hotel. As we did a quick shoot of the inside; we could hear afternoon shoppers stopping by for their takeout coffee and cake fix making their orders over the drive through intercom. We even enjoyed a couple of cold drinks inside the shop after we came out of the church right next door! The building was put to tender in March 1869 with the stone-laying ceremony taking place on 21st July. The church, provided 550 sittings at a cost of £4,167 and was built of stone from the local Crosland Hill quarries. Initially the Clerk of Works was Mr Jonathan Parsons;subsequently succeeded by Mr Phillips. Consecration took place on 10th August 1880. The church was built by a local architect and protected by local laws from demolition and has remained empty since 2004 #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157679116734258/with/40308289993/
  19. 3 points
    Not done a report for a while and I have quite a backlog. I always think it's good to see places whether they've been done or not just to see how they're getting on. So I'll start working my way through them as and when I can be arsed. First up. Warwick Mill, Middleton, Jan 19 Can’t really find too much out about this one other Grade II listed. The mill was built in 1907 built from red brick with a cast iron frame. It’s most recent uses were as an airsoft centre on a few of the upper levels a few pallets and bits of netting remain each floor is littered in millions of bb’s, which make for some comedy cartoon slips. Half of the ground floor looked like it was used as a tool or DIY sort of shop going off the melted remains of product stands. The rest of the ground floor that was untouched by fire used to be a small community centre. As far as mills go it’s your pretty standard big brick mill. Pretty stripped, but still some nice features to have a nosey at. The rope race is still here and is good to see. The engine room has been bricked up at the rope race and a lift installed. The engine room, as a lot have, has been used as a loading bay and was full of flooring tiles. Still has the original tiling in place though. The were plans approved to convert it into a trading hub but it’s a few years back now so that idea is probably dead in the water. More info below: https://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/business/property/middleton-mill-become-50m-global-10583740 Pics Start off with a couple of old photo’s from Library archives
  20. 3 points
    Quite extraordinary from the outside, this villa is hidden in the hills of central Italy. The whole property consists of a huge garden, swimming pool, some sheds for dogs and probably a garage, the most eye catching is the main yellow castle-ish looking house. It used to belong to a man who was made a knight by Italian king. The owner actually had a strange interest in anatomy, pathology, science and medicine and some of his "patients" and guests used to stay in this extravagant house. It's hard to say when it was abandoned. Most of the rooms are still fully furnished and there still hasn't been to much vandalism, yet some objects got already stolen. Beds are still perfectly made, there are many personal items like clothing, hairbrush or hand-written notebook with recipes. Compared to the nicely kept ground floor, the upper parts of the villa are pretty unsafe and rooms are mostly furnished in a very simple way. I rather didn't dare to enter one of the bedrooms as the floor felt like it was collapsing. In another room the ceiling was already almost completelly collapsed, other rooms had huge cracks in the walls.
  21. 3 points
    Urbexing is new to me. When i was younger we just called it exploring. Anyway. The reason i was curious about maps was that i spend hundreds of hours finding tracks and trails that i ride. This year i ride from north east Holland, Mussel , down through Holland then into Germany then back into Belguim towards the coast then into France where i head towards Paris. From there i turn towards Normandy for the 75th D Day celebrations......all on trails and tracks. I was hoping to find some places of interest along my route, or at least close by. I have already found one. Just over the Belguim boarder there is a house that, supposedly the owner kept people in the cellar till thier death. I only have 8 weeks before i leave and most of my time at present is taken with rebuilding my bike after a catastrophic engine failure. I look forward to the future here. Below is a picture of the bike i ride in 7 weeks. All my time is in that at the moment.
  22. 2 points
    have passed this often and today thought lets have a look; it is a former station masters house on the hawarden Loop; a once thriving goods and passenger depot Well that was a waste of 15 mins I must say!!! still here is my wonderous adventure
  23. 2 points
    Another weekend, another backlog! I really need to streamline my reporting process! Part of a little day out with Mookster back before Christmas, we did this Tourist Trail steelworks; and it was a rather nice morning out; albeit a little smashed inside. The works were originally established in 1855 with an office staff of four, three small furnaces, a small foundry; plus iron fields at Stanton and in the neighbourhood parish of Dale Abbey, and the Ironstone Bell pits at Babbington. Messrs George and John Crompton; the three founders; were brothers and partners in the firm of bankers of Crompton and Evans - Mr Newton and Mr. Barber. In the infant years; the pig iron was made entirely from local ore, but in 1865 Northamptonshire ores were introduced into the mixtures; with iron mines in Leceistershire and Northamptonshire acquired and developed. In 1878 the pipe foundry, now potentially the largest in Great Britain, and possibly the world, was started under the management of Mr James Chambers. Circa 1914; the company had 7000 people on its pay roll - 3000 here at Stanton, the same number at the collieries and 1000 at the ironstone mines. In 1951 it was nationalised and became part of the Iron and Steel Corporation of Great Britain. A takeover in 1960 by Stewarts & Lloyds Ltd happened. and was merged with Staveley Iron & Chemical Co. to form the Stanton & Staveley company. In 1967 Stanton & Staveley was incorporated into British Steel. During the early 1980s the Stanton site became part of the French Pont-a-Mouson Group and later part of Saint Gobain, manufacturing cast iron pipes. Production finally ceased on May 24th 2007, and subsequently a huge amount of the site was demolished around 2009/2010. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157678405612458
  24. 2 points
    Once in a while a house appears that is just something else and this house was one of those. Visited with Ninja Kitten one cold November day. I know a lot of history to this house but will hold it back to protect the house. Giving too much detail of its history along with names would compromise it. The photographs can speak for themselves. A veritable feast of dusty vintage artefacts locked in another time. The bedroom pictured here looked as if it had remained as it was when the very young soldier perished in WW1. An organic museum if ever there was one in existence. A museum to a fallen soldier. Hope you enjoy
  25. 2 points
    Millennium tower Salford quays It is not to be confused by the never-built London Millennium Tower (which could’ve gone up to 386 metres!). The dual building is a residential highrise located on the eastern side of the Media City Quays. The tallest one of the two is 67 metres, and the shorter one (Millennium Point) at around 45 metres. Designed to suit the modernised skyline of Salford, it has a rather minimalistic approach. Luckily not a lot of information can be salvaged from the internet, so I don’t have to type up much Had a look on the roof of the millennium tower. Was evening time so photos were late afternoon then a walk around media city. DSC_3193 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3229 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3229 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3221 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3205 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3203 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3198 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3253 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3252 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3244 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3240 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3239 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3234 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3238 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
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