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  1. 16 points
    Thought i would jump on the tour bus with this one being as its quite close to me. Visited with Lolly92 Some History Saint Cadoc's Hospital is located in Caerloen on the northern outskirts of the city of Newport. The building was designed by Alfred J. Wood FRIBA, London and named after Saint Cadoc. Saint Cadoc's church is located in the town. The hospital, which opened in 1906 as the Newport Borough Asylum, was built to accommodate up to 350 patients. Extensive outbuildings were later added on the site, but since 2005 the number of residents has been very small with the growing emphasis on care in the community. St Cadoc's Hospital provides a number of mental health services, Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services, Adult Mental Health Services are provided by 11 Community Mental Health Teams and Elderly Mental Health Services provided by 5 multi-disciplinary Community Mental Health Teams Pics Thanks for looking
  2. 15 points
    Living just a few minutes drive away, @SpiderMonkey and I decided not to leave this one too long. The place is still pretty clean, just a few leaves around the place now. I'm not sure what the future will hold, maybe it will stay and get overgrown for a bit, who knows... Opening on the 27th May 1993, Pleasure Island was a theme park in Cleethorpes featuring 47 rides including roller coasters amongst the thrill rides and numerous smaller rides for younger visitors. Work began in the 1980s to build the site on the site of a former zoo by the owners of Pleasurewood Hills park near Lowestoft, and the new site in Cleethorpes was set to have the same name. The company went into receivership in the early 1990s and construction was halted. The site was then sold to Robert Gibb, the owner of Flamingo Land in North Yorkshire. Construction resumed and was completed in 1992, opening the following year. View over the park from the top of the roller coaster In 2010 Flamingo Land and Pleasure Island were separated into two independent companies, with Robert Gibb retaining Flamingo Land and his sisters Vicky Gibb and Melanie Wood (formerly Gibb) taking control of Pleasure Island. Unexpectedly, the park was temporarily closed in 2010 while negotiations took place, staff and visitors were turned away at the front gate. A petting zoo was added in 2013, along with a tractor ride replacing an old monorail. In 2016 it was announced the park would be closing at the end of the season, and only the McCormack’s bar would be reopening in 2017. On arriving at the park, visitors were greeted with an Old England themed entrance area with pay booths Making your way, you start to move through the different areas. First up was Morocco... Gravitron Ride The Galleon Pirate Ship Then on to the dodgems.... Tucked away in the corner of the park were the sea lions. The pool was still full of water and I'm not sure whether the inhabitants had been re-homed yet... Continuing around the park we find a few more rides... And a quick stop off at the Astra Slide gives a nice view over the areas we've just looked around Heading into White Knuckle Valley, first we find the Terror Rack... And then come across the main attraction, the Boomerang roller coaster The view from the top was pretty spectacular! Continuing on, we find the Pendulus ride Kids slider and Paratower And the Mini Mine Train Finally, we look at the Carousel ride, which is a really old traditional carousel. My favourite!
  3. 13 points
    This place was part of a giant complex where they used to build trains for the national railroad company. Most of the site was already demolished by the time we got here, but the lab itself was still worth the visit. It's been abandoned since 2010, which is sort of surprising, if you look at the amount of decay, but well, I'm not complaining about that at all... Actually took 2 visits to get in. First attempt was on a thursday afternoon. Entered the site, walked to the particular building and said to my girl: "what's that noise?!" Peeked inside the building and got instantly spotted by demolition workers... Took a run and returned a few days later in the weekend. More luck that time. Have to say, definitely worth it... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Thanks for looking!!
  4. 13 points
    On a rather rushed last day this was our second to last stop. We were instantly eyed up by the residents of the flats opposite, but after a while of milling around trying not to look suspicious they disappeared. It wasn't long before we were inside and it really hit me. Rows and rows of cages lines the walls and the remains of the labs upstairs. It was interesting to shoot, something different - but one I never want to visit again. As always, thanks for looking!
  5. 13 points
    New Scotland Yard New Scotland Yard was located on Broadway in Victoria and has been the Metropolitan Police's headquarters since 1967. By the 1960s the requirements of modern technology and further increases in the size of the force meant that it had outgrown its Victoria Embankment site. In 1967 New Scotland Yard moved to the site on Broadway, which was an existing office block acquired under a long-term lease. The Met's senior management team was based at New Scotland Yard, along with the Met's crime database. This uses a national computer system developed for major crime enquiries by all British forces, called Home Office Large Major Enquiry System, more commonly referred to by the acronym HOLMES, which recognises the great fictional detective Sherlock Holmes. The training programme is called 'Elementary', after Holmes's well-known, yet apocryphal, phrase "elementary, my dear Watson". A number of security measures were added to the exterior of New Scotland Yard during the 2000s, including concrete barriers in front of ground-level windows as a countermeasure against car bombing, a concrete wall around the entrance to the building, and a covered walkway from the street to the entrance into the building. Armed officers from the Diplomatic Protection Group patrolled the exterior of the building along with security staff. In May 2013 the Metropolitan Police confirmed that the New Scotland Yard building on Broadway would be sold and the force's headquarters would be moved back to the Curtis Green Building on the Victoria Embankment, and renamed Scotland Yard. Ahead of the move to the Embankment, the Metropolitan Police sold New Scotland Yard to Abu Dhabi Financial Group in December 2014 for £370 million. Staff left New Scotland Yard on 1 November 2016, when ownership of the building was passed to Abu Dhabi Financial Group who plan to redevelop the site into luxury apartments, offices and shops. The Metropolitan Police are due to move to the Embankment in early 2017. Since this appeared on here a couple of months ago I've visited a few times with @Maniac, @KM Punk, @starlight, @extreme_ironing, @Miss.Anthrope, @adders, @Porkerofthenight, @DirtyJigsaw, @TrollJay, @Merryprankster, monkey, suboffender, silentwalker, theriddler, dragonsoop, and many non members. Most of these photos were taken on my first visit when we did a sweep of every floor looking for anything of interest. Much had been stripped before the Met handed it over unfortunately but there was still enough to make it a decent explore. The view from the roof is pretty sensational on a clear evening, made even more special by the fact you are sitting on top of perhaps the most notorious police Headquarters in the world. A great place for a dragon soop and some classic 80s tunes. 1. Starting from the bottom and working our way up, the underground car park. Sadly no bunkers or anything quite so interesting under here. 2. Security control room for monitoring cctv and opening gates. 3. 4. 5. Press conference room 6. Briefing room 7. Locker room, now in use by construction workers. 8. A message from the last officer to leave 9. These marble lift lobbies were the only bit of grandeur really, the lifts were still fully functional which came in handy a couple of times. 10. 11. The remains of a once plush office 12. How most of the building looked....stripped and being prepared for a new lease of life 13. Pretty much every floor had large server rooms in the centre, this one in particular held restricted access servers. 14. Where firearms would have been distributed, there was a similar firearms storage room on the ground floor. 15. Label on the cupboard above 16. Sand boxes presumably for discharging rounds of ammo when handing in firearms 17. safe room 18. 19. Bridge connecting the two buildings together 20. Just off the bridge sat this lecture theatre, a week later it was completely ripped to pieces. 21. 22. Canteen 23. Cctv monitoring work station 24. 25. Plant room on the top floor 26. Engineer's control room 27. 28. And last but not least, the rooftop. 29. 30. 55 Broadway, TfL's art deco Headquarters until recently 31. Buckingham Palace 32. One of the best views in London really 33. 34. 35. Fish eye view from the top of the mast. Scotland Yard, it's been emotional.....
  6. 12 points
    During a little trip trough Germany last year, we've visited this former Military airport. In WWII the Nazi's used it as a training camp for the German Air Force. In 1945 the Russians took it over, now it's abandoned since 1994 Some feedback is welcome, 'cause I'm not sattisfied with all the pictures. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10
  7. 12 points
    History This mortuary was nestled in the Northern Ireland countryside. It was small, quaint & perfect! A small chapel inside accompanied the mortuary. With no body fridges which was one of the first things I noticed I could only put that down to either it was a mortuary whereby bodies were not stored or given the history of Northern Ireland & tradition with death they were not needed as bodies are usually buried within 3 days. Possible that a body fridge could have been removed I guess but no signs that there was ever one there. The main thing I noticed which was pretty hard to miss was the perfectly kept porcelain table. Not only porcelain but a rotating one! I had the pleasure of visiting another in the north of the UK a couple of years ago & that in itself shows how hard to come by these are. Now anyone who knows me & my love for death/mortuaries/embalming etc will know this was like pure porn to me. When searching for new places, the unseen if you like.. to find a fresh one and one of this kind is infact a rareity. To be able to put together the history, including that of the slab is as interesting as visiting it The table was deep, very big lip on it. No drainage channels at all, just a nice recess around the perimeter which deepened leading to a drain at the far end. Then on the foot of the table was the word Twyfords, now I Still haven't got around to seeing 2 Twyfords porcelain tables at another uk mortuary and others which have long gone. Twyfords are known for their sanitary products, toilets, basins etc but they extended in to the mortuary field too. Cliff Vale potteries was built by TW Twyford in 1887. It was Cliff Vale where the slabs were fired in Stoke On trent. The word Twyfords would have been added with a 'flow blue' application..a deep cobalt blue inking. An underglaze pottery printed. The blue tends to flow in to the glaze giving off a blurred effect. This would have been done prior to firing the slab. The slab itself would have been fireclay, as would the belfast sink that you see in the same room. This firing recipe would have required particular firing conditions. Buff Coloured clay body with a bright white enamelled surface built to withstand strength and rough usage it was perfect for mortuary slabs. Lucky enough to find the porcelain slab and a Belfast sink with both wings intact was something of a find. The explore I explored with @hamtagger, we hadnt been out much lately due to family commitments and took the opportunity to put our research to good use while out there. Visiting family over there always gives us a good enough reason. I knew from looking at this place that it was what we thought, it was what was meant to be inside that was questionable. Having made a journey to Frenchay to discover that only the previous week the ceramic slab and all stainless ones had been removed I was holding not much hope. I tend not to get my hopes up nowadays, just take the rough with the smooth. But this... well.. we couldn't have hoped for more. It was somewhere I didn't want to leave, very atmospheric despite being quite sparse. Literally no vandalism or graffitti at all. Just how we like it. There were signs that someone had been in recently but they had respected it as we had. I would definitely go back here, even just to give the old girl a good old polish! On with the pics... 1 2 3 4 An old advert from Cliff Vale & Twyfords (I found this online) 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Thanks for looking
  8. 12 points
    In 2008 this village was built close to the national stadium to house hundreds of athletes for the Beijing Olympics. Unfortunately due to the level of bad pollution in the city many of the athletes decided to stay outside the city instead so the project was abandoned. Nothing has been done since with the properties although there was a fair bit of activity at one end of the site. The village consists of several streets of villas which look almost finished from the outside but are completely empty inside. There is also a huge club house with four floors and a swimming pool called the Homko Club. Spent a couple of hours here with @Maniacbefore resorting to more ridiculously cheap beer and food, well worth a visit if you're in Beijing. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Some houses were slightly more advanced in their construction but not by much. 6. Looking out from a car garage 7. 8. 9. The Homko Club 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. Thanks for looking
  9. 12 points
    Diving back into the backlog again I remembered this gorgeous powerstation I visited on a euro trip with @Vulex, @TheVampiricSquid and @Redhunter It was the last stop on the trip, and for me, definitely made up for an otherwise disappointing day, but unfortunately we did have to rush to get back to dover in time Central Ohm was built in the early 20th century, to power the iron works, which was one of the largest in belgium. This is now the oldest remaining building of the site, and has been restored, to be used most recently as an events hall. And some photos As always, thanks for looking
  10. 11 points
    Such a beautiful abandoned villa in Italy. I couldn't believe my eyes when I entered this huge hallway with a stunning ceiling and painted walls. There is also a chapel, but we had to be very quiet, I didn't take a look, cause it was very noisy. Probably you have seen this one before, but I couldn't choose wich one to show you #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12
  11. 11 points
    Last month @SpiderMonkey and I were given the heads-up on this place and after a quick Google we decided to head down to Worcester at the next available opportunity. We noticed a few people had tried before, only to find active security scuppering their success, so we were slightly apprehensive about what we may have to deal with. It would seem we got lucky with timing and found it relatively relaxed. I had serious wind that day! History St Mary’s Convent School was originally Battenhall Mount, an impressive house built around 1865-9 for William Spriggs, a Quaker and Worcester Clothier, in the Italianate style popularised by Prince Albert. In the 1890s the house was enlarged in a matching style by the architect John Henry Williams of Worcester for the Hon. Alfred Percy Allsopp. Allsopp was a local brewer who owned the Star Hotel and was Mayor of Worcester in 1892, 1894 and 1905. The original house is now incorporated into the South West corner of the property. The building was used as a convalescent home during the First World War. It then became the home of the Sisters of St. Marie Madeleine Postel, a Roman Catholic Teaching Order, in 1933. St. Mary’s was a popular and well-regarded independent nursery and school until its closure in 2014. Italianate styled interior, matching the external appearance... Moving into the music room, which was just as impressive with its large fireplace And this drawing room! Entrance lobby and top of the tower Moving further, we find the later addition of buildings that forms the main concentration of classrooms Yes, we tried it out! Nursery St Mary's School also has a nursery in the same grounds, in a separate building set a little away from the main buildings.
  12. 11 points
    Colbert was an anti-air cruiser, later transformed into a missile cruiser, of the French Navy. She served in the Navy from 1956 to 1991, before being converted into a museum ship. She was abandoned off the coast of Brittany in 2007 and in 2016 she was taken away to be scrapped. Having missed this ship when it was moored in Brittany, I was pretty gutted to hear of it's removal for demolition. I didn't think much more about it until it popped up in conversation a few months later and I decided to hunt down it's new location. It turned out demolition was expected to take 18 months so we decided to take a punt seeing as it was only 6 months down the line at this point. All we knew was that it was meant to be moored near a certain bridge. On the first night our taxi driver took us to the wrong bridge so there was no sign of the boat. I asked some locals and they told me it was long gone, absolutely gutted. We soon realised we'd been to the wrong bridge so decided to have another look the following day. At this point we weren't feeling hopeful but as soon as we reached the bridge we spotted her in the distance. Bingo! Unfortunately the missiles were gone and much of the ship had been cleared out but it was still a proper adventure and good to finally get on board the dirty bitch! Bigups to @Maniac @Merryprankster Law & Ben. 1. 2. 3. Ventilation system for the removal of asbestos, this was what stopped us from being able to access much of the ship. 4. Officer's bedroom 5. Bunk bed 6. 7. Laundry 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. Gyroscope 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. & 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. The Bridge 32. 33. 34. Bon appétit
  13. 11 points
    Mr Norreys House After getting a tip off from a friend i had to check this place out, and what was inside definitely wasn't expected! The amount of untouched hidden gems was unbelievable, from cameras, to old T.V's just covered in dust. From what i could gather, Mr Norrey was a wealthy man, and owned a Food Wholesalers, unfortunately i couldn't find anything to indicate when the place was left, with paper work from the 40s all the way up to 2004 it wasn't easy to tell. on with the photos. Enjoy Thanks For Looking!
  14. 11 points
    War Planes After a rather unsuccessful first day we made it back to the hotel - drained, tired and demotivated. We were all hoping for a success on this one, and boy did it deliver! After only a few hours sleep I felt my phone buzzing.. the generic iPhone alarm chiming away. Still tired from the day before bags were packed in a zombie-like fashion before meeting up with everyone down in the lobby. We hit the road and before long we were pulling up to the access point. Thick fog helped cover our access, and soon enough we were following a path to where these beauties lie. What sounded like a car horn echoed in the distance, so we took off running through waist high grass - getting drenched in the process from the morning dew, but it lead to be nothing more than a false alarm. It seemed we got here at the perfect time - the fog cleared and the sun cast a beautiful orange glow through the windows of the beast. As always, thanks for looking!
  15. 11 points
    Explored way back in January of this year. The Centurion Psychiatric Hospital was opened in 1902, as a care facility for patients with severe mental illnesses. In total there are about 20 or so buildings making up the sprawling property, while many of the buildings are newer brick structures, dating anywhere from the 10's to the 70's, some of the buildings here date back all the way to 1828, when the property was used as a arsenal by the US army. After the civil war ended it was turned into a barracks and a prison, where it held captured Apache Indians, including the famous Indian Geronimo. Between avoiding the security which regularly drives around the property, and many buildings still locked up fairly tight, we were only able to get into 4 of the buildings. These buildings though are by far and away some of the coolest we've ever had the chance to explore. The kind of place you dream about. Full album here https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157662603167070/with/24072351312/. Thanks for looking!
  16. 11 points
    Explored with @CuriousityKilledTheCat , @TheVampiricSquid , @Redhunter and a n0n OS member... After driving around for about half an hour, ending up in completely the wrong place, getting eaten alive by mozzies, we'd finally managed to find the correct place ( 2 seconds away from where we were ) Loved exploring this place, although there wasnt much left in what i assume was the Accommodation blocks, the natural decay made for some pretty awesome shots! unfortunately the basement was completely flooded so we couldn't get any shots in there. History! (courtesy of wiki) Opened in 1937, it saw the peak of its activity during the years of the Second World War, when it served within the defence network of fighter bases of the RAF providing protection for the Leeds, Bradford, Sheffield and Humberside industrial regions. During September 1940 it became home to the first RAF "Eagle squadron" of American volunteers being No. 71 Squadron RAF initially with the Brewster Buffalo I for one month before changing to the Hawker Hurricane I. The airfield was also home to both the first all-Canadian and all-Polish squadrons, with No. 242 Squadron RAF for the Canadians and No. 306 Squadron RAF for the Polish Enjoy! Cheers for looking
  17. 11 points
    A bit late in the game to this one as when we had arrived it was already half demo'ed. But lucky enough there was still plenty to see and photograph. History (taken form https://www.cmft.nhs.uk/media/595587/history of altrincham.pdf) Altrincham’s hospital services began in 1853 when Lloyd’s Fever Hospital was built. By 1860 the hospital was making a vital contribution to improving access to health care for local residents. A Provident Dispensary was opened in 1861. Subscribers of a weekly sum could be treated at the hospital when necessary. The population of Altrincham was growing and in 1870, the management of Lloyds Fever Hospital and Provident Dispensary was handed over to the new Altrincham Provident Dispensary and Hospital, marking the establishment of what would become Altrincham General Hospital. Lloyds Fever Hospital closed in 1911. The building was pulled down and the site turned into a children’s playground. As the threat of the First World War emerged the local Red Cross Society asked the hospital for permission to train volunteer nurses on its wards. It was agreed that two nurses would be trained at a time if they provided their own uniforms. On 10th August 1914, six days after the declaration of war the hospital sent a telegram to the War Office offering the use of a ward of 16 beds for wounded soldiers. By November the ward was in full use. The hospital continued to provide healthcare after the outbreak of World War II with beds reserved for expected air-raid casualties. An air raid shelter was built in the hospital basement. On 5th July 1948, the NHS was established and Altrincham General became the headquarters for the new North and Mid-Cheshire Management Committee. In the current day, Altrincham General provides a minor injuries unit, a range of out-patient clinics, physiotherapy, X-ray, and blood test services to the local population. Work recently began on a new £17 million state-of-the-art hospital development in Altrincham town centre. The four-story development will provide modern, high quality facilities for existing services, as well as additional services for local people. The new hospital is expected to open to the public by early 2015.
  18. 11 points
    One of the better condition asylums I've been to over the years, which ain't surprising with it only closing in 2011. With it taking over 7 hours to get up to the place camping on the beach for an early start was the best option. After avoiding the crazy amount of dog walkers we finally managed to find a way in and it was worth it for the older looking side to the hospital. I mostly spent my time in the older looking side to the place as you can see from my photos. The newer side was a bit trashed and very much a modern looking hospital. A great explore cut short by the time it would take to get back south of the border. Brief history:- Sunnyside Royal hospital was a psychiatric hospital founded in 1781 located in Hillside, Scotland. The hospital was originally founded as the Montrose Lunatic Asylum, Infirmary & Dispensary. In 1858 the hospital moved to a newly built site on the land of Sunnyside farm. Over the years a few extensions and additional buildings were added including name changes. After being open for 230 years most patients were sent to a new £20 million build at Stracathro Hospital.
  19. 10 points
    Solo jaunt, part 2/3 of my (temporary) swansong. Well, this was epic. The best asylum I've had the pleasure of exploring, and possibly the best asylum of the "post-classic" era when most closed. And definitely one of the most memorable explores I have ever done. If it was any one site that inspired me to finally visit the Emerald Isle, it was this. As always, I turned up at the site completely unprepared and without any idea of what to expect. As I walked round the building, I see the grounds are well maintained, and someone is there walking their dog. Is it security? What are those cars doing at the top of the site? I didn't have a clue. I wasn't feeling that nervous, so I spotted my (possible) way in and ran straight for it. Hidden from the view of the street, I searched for a way in, which didn't take long; though far from trashed, I can see where others managed to gain access and followed their path. I was inside, and was overcome with a really strange feeling; nervous, but like I was in another world (stay with me, I'm not talking about ghosts). I'm inside the building, and with the exception of the water dripping down there's a dead silence. The windows facing the outside are boarded, forcing me to use torchlight. All the rooms are empty and have been tagged with crap like "redrum" and the usual "haunted house" jibber jabber. One of the patient rooms on the ward. Small, secluded rooms were a contrast to the likes of the dorms found in places like Our Lady's in Ennis. As I make my way to the other wards of the vast complex, I randomly flick a light switch and boom! The room flickers back to life; the power is still on! Not only that, in so many rooms so much has been left behind. Unlike the likes of Fairmile and its empty, non-descript wards, this felt so much more real. So much more personal, even if it's just furniture. With no security to contend with, and hearing so little outside beyond cars going past, I was in a different world. I had stepped through the looking glass, and was lost within the walls of the institution, lost in my own thoughts. I'm alone, disconnected from the outside world. I feel no fear, but a feeling of peace and serenity as I wander the almost endless corridors. Apart from the crumbling walls and ceilings, it feels like this place is trapped in a time warp from when it closed in 2009. It is for this reason this has been one of the most memorable moments in my life exploring. Look into the mirror as two storks look down on you... it feels like a Hitchcock film. As I continue to wander the corridors, further away from where I was, there was less evidence of anyone coming here. No graffiti, no smashed glass, no footprints; things felt like they had been left as they were since closure. The ward below was only accessible from a single, long corridor. No idea what kind of patients were kept here, but there was once an identical ward at the other end; this had since been demolished, though when I don't know. There was no main hall designed into the asylum, so I went for a look through the industrial side of the hospital. This place kept on giving and giving. As the last port of call, I checked out the ground floor of the administration. The power was still on, and the check-in machine on the desk was still powered up and showing the correct date and time! I didn't turn on the telly to check if the CCTV was still live though, ha! Behind this room, there were tons of books piled up on the desks; inside were reports going back years regarding patient finances, admissions and discharges, in addition to letters written to and from patients (though not medical records). For privacy reasons no pictures were taken. I made my way back to my entry point, and made a swift exit. I was absolutely overjoyed to have seen what I saw, until I realized I made a ridiculous blunder... I forgot the bloody clocktower! D'arrrrrghhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh! But instead of going back inside, I followed the dog walkers and locals and decided to have a sniff round the outbuildings. The signs said there was a mortuary nearby, but before I did that I had a look at the chapels. I can't work out why, but on this site were an original chapel AND a newer built one a little bit further up. Both, however were locked. The mortuary/chapel of rest was different... This had been completely boarded up, but here the door in the hoarding was unlocked. The best way to describe this mortuary, which was a modern build and not the original would be like an an "airing shelter", free to walk into but with rooms inside. I sneak inside, and there's a gurney in the corner. The door into the chapel of rest (which was still rammed with stuff) and two other doors (probably the toilets, unlikely to be fridges) were locked. I find one of the glazed windows unlocked, so I open it only to find it covered inside with protective mesh! Double d'arrrrrrrrghhhhhhhhhhhhh! Across the way was possibly occupational therapy and the farm buildings, accessible but full from floor to ceiling with beds and paraphenalia from the hospital when it was closed, making it impossible to take photos or navigate. The additional ward at the head of the site was completely sealed, and next door to the last live building on site so no access there. Inevitably any comparison to those two iconic Surrey asylums is anathema, but if you never saw either of these then a trip to St Brigid's should be at the top of your list. This is one of the best asylums I have ever seen, so get out there and have a look whilst you still can. You will NOT be disappointed! Lots of love, TBM x
  20. 10 points
    Explore; A very fun weekend in London including rooftops, underground things and opening live doors that seem derps, topped off with a tour of this place. Unfortunatley, they weren't allowing access to other parts of the premises however, the main part was cool. Visited with @SpiderMonkey @AndyK! and @PROJ3CTM4YH3M. Cheers for looking!
  21. 10 points
    History RAF Spadeadam is an active Royal Air Force station in Cumbria, close to the border of Northumbria. Covering 9,000 acres, it is the largest RAF base in the United Kingdom. It is currently used as an Electronic Warfare Tactics Range, to train the Royal Air Force and NATO allies. It is also the only mainland UK location where aircrews can drop practice bombs. Spadeadam has always been a remote and uninhabited part of England, until 1955 when the Intermediate Ballistic Missile Test Centre was constructed for the Blue Streak missile project – a project that was launched to develop a nuclear deterrent missile. The RAF took over the base in 1976 and under their control it became the Electronic Warfare Tactics Range in 1977. The range itself contains ground-based electronic equipment, including some that was manufactured in the Soviet Union, that create simulated threats to train aircrews. Across the site there are different real and dummy targets which include an airfield, a village, portable buildings, tanks, aircraft, anti-aircraft guns and vehicle convoys. The site was originally used in secret as part of Britain’s Cold War nuclear weapons programme. This information was only made public in 2004 when tree-felling work uncovered the remains of abandoned excavations for a missile silo. Since then, the RAF and English Heritage have attempted to survey the site and record what was so secret about the place, because there are no official records or plans for the base still in existence from the Cold War period. What is known, however, is that Spadeadam was chosen as a launch site because of its isolation, access to road connections and the surrounding environment which supported it with plenty of water. It is thought that Spadeadam was meant to be one of sixty launch sites across the UK, but most of these were never built. This report is based on the practice airfield area of RAF Spadeadam. It is hidden away in a small forest and completely surrounded by a peat bog. The airfield itself comprises a triangular shaped runway which features a number of aircraft (mostly MIG fighter jets), military vehicles and anti-aircraft guns. Our Version of Events It was a decent sunnyafternoon and we were a little tired of being indoors, so we decided to follow up a lead we had on an abandoned airfield somewhere in Northumbria. The journey was great, all the way up to the borders of Northumbria at least. But, from that point on the heavens opened and what had previously been a glorious day was now a very shit one. Nevertheless, rather than turn back we figured we’d just get wet and have a look for abandoned aeroplanes anyway. We arrived, in the middle of absolutely fucking nowhere and were getting slightly concerned about how long it had taken us to get there. It took a moment to get our bearings, since there is no signal out in the sticks, but we had a vague idea which way we had to walk. So, ready to rock and roll we ditched the car at the side of the road and headed off into the vast bog in front of us. Fortunately, at this point the rain had stopped, but unfortunately we instantly got soaked as we plodded across land that deceived us into thinking it was solid. This epic struggle continued the entire way. If anyone has ever seen the Vicar of Dibley sketch, where she jumps into the puddle and completely disappears, this was exactly like that. After much scrambling around in the bog, and wandering through dense patches of forest, we were well and truly lost. No signal, no map, no food, but plenty of water… It was bad craic. For some reason, though, we decided to have one last wander through some pine trees. We were feeling pretty deflated at this point, so I’m not sure what was driving us on, but in the end we were glad we did carry on. After another ten minutes of aimless wandering, we caught a glimpse of something that looked conspicuously like the tail of a fighter jet. I’ve never heard of mirages in a peat bog before, so I instantly decided that what we were seeing must have been real. Instantly forgetting about how miserable we’d been feeling, we waded on, working our way towards a great big silver MIG that was glistening in the fading sunlight. Once we reached the runway, we were surprised to discover that it wasn’t tarmac. It was some shitty gravel substance that was just as waterlogged as the damn bog. But, right in front of us were two shiny MIG fighter jets, and they looked fucking awesome after all the walking. So, conscious that daylight was rapidly turning into night, we whipped out the old cameras and began our invasion of the airfield. We began with the first two jets and then made our way towards what appeared to be an abandoned fuel truck further in the distance. It took a few minutes to get there, but it was well worth it since we could suddenly see six or seven more aircraft and several guns a little further ahead. Our assault had been successful, and we soon found ourselves surrounded by more guns and bombs than even Rambo could handle. We also found a few unused smoke grenades which is something we’ve never encountered on an explore before. We hung around the airfield until darkness was nearly upon us, then decided to call it a day because we suddenly remembered we had to walk back through a forest and a bog to get back to the car. So, still having been undetected by the RAF, we made our way back to the treeline. A little more worried about stepping on a mine now after discovering the grenades, or some sort of unexploded bomb, we headed off back into the bog. The same shit journey we’d endured an hour or so previously began all over again. Splish, splash, splosh… Those three sounds were back again, and they all sounded just as shit as before. Explored with Rizla Rider. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22:
  22. 10 points
    The History (shamelessly ripped from Wiki) Holborn tramway station was a tram stop underneath Kingsway in central London, England. It was built in 1906 by the London County Council Tramways as part of the Kingsway Tramway Subway joining the separate networks of tramways in North and South London. When opened it was named Great Queen Street. Tram services commenced on 24 February 1906, running from Angel to Aldwych, the next station in the subway. Through services across London began on 10 April 1908, running from Highbury station through Holborn and then east to Tower Bridge or south to Gate. The routes that used the Kingsway Subway were numbered 31, 33, and 35. Following the decision to withdraw tram services in London and replace them with buses, the station closed just after 12.30am on 6 April 1952. Much of the station remains in the disused subway but there is no public access. Following it's closure, the station was used as a backdrop various TV shows & films. Most notably it was featured in the 2008 film The Escapist, as a fictional London Underground station called "Union Street", which was said to be on the Northern Line between Elephant & Castle and Borough. Remains of the film props, such as a fake tube map and a Union Street tube roundel, can still be seen pasted to the walls of the station. The props date from 2008, and are not part of the original station. In 2009 the subway and station was the venue for an art installation, Chord, by Conrad Shawcross. The Explore This was a short but sweet explore that we did while on the way to something else. I did this one with my missus & partner in crime Vixxie , as well as @extreme_ironing . We started off the night with a quick round in one of the local watering holes, to give us a spot of Dutch courage & to catch up with goings on & such. We then made our way over to the entry point, which was rather fun to say the least. It’s pretty pedestrian as far as this type of splore goes, but it’s still a rather bait affair. Needless to say, the Dayglo invisibility cloak was in full effect! Once we were all in, we had a scope of the area. Having heard about a lot of activity at one end of the place, we were slightly on edge. We decided to go over to the other side first, & soon we arrived at the old poster boards. They look pretty plain in themselves, just large metal panels with a surround, but together with original cream & olive green brickwork, you could easily imagine what it was like when the place was in operation. I took a couple of shots from here, which wasn’t easy. I imagine it would have been some time ago, that is until someone fucked a giant concrete wall through the middle of the platform! After this we got to a large open room with pillars running down it. Walking through got progressively difficult, with the sloping ceiling tapering to nothing at the far side. Half way down we found a little tunnel offshoot which we crawled into. The tunnel started to curve around quite sharply, we worked out that this is where Kingsway becomes the Strand. After a bit of a tight walk through, the tunnel came to an abrupt end. Rested against the wall was a workman’s ladder, which lead up to what looked like a ledge. Being rather curious I decided to go up & have a look. Up top there was a large plastic cover which capped off the space, I thought “that’s odd”, & so I pulled it up to have a look. What I didn’t realise is that it wasn’t a ledge or crawl space at all, rather the top of the wall, & over the other side was the busy road tunnel! With nothing else to see there, we headed over to the money shots, which were the fake Union Street roundels & propaganda posters. Even though they aren’t real, seeing them still gives you that sense that you’ve found something special. I especially enjoyed the poster board, which was rammed full of old wartime posters & fliers. What I didn’t know about & what was a nice find were all of the old cast iron street lights piled up along one side. It seemed a shame that they weren’t being put to use, but part of me was thinking it’s nicer to see them here than painted up all new like on the streets. We gathered a few more snaps of the place, whilst being cautious of movement further along the tunnel. Not wanting to push our luck, & needing to continue to the next location, we made our way back out. The Pics 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 Thanks for looking
  23. 10 points
    Set off for a lil trip with @MrObvious and someone else, and I was pleasantly surprised. Two mills close to each other kept us occupied for a few hours - lovely locations with some beautiful natural decay. Shame our visit was cut short by the local chav infestation arriving, and throwing bricks from the top floor window, but i was happy with some of the images i got anyway As always, thanks for looking!
  24. 10 points
    After 2 failed sites, this was the second successful site with the huns @CuriousityKilledTheCat , @TheVampiricSquid , @Redhunter and a non OS member on our 24 hour road trip. This was the main site i wanted to see, and it didn't disappoint! Enjoy Thanks for looking!
  25. 10 points
    The Coal Exchange in Cardiff was constructed as a place where trade negotiations regarding the sale of coal could be conducted. Constructed between 1884 and 1888 by Edwin Seward, the grand building features paired Corinthian columns, an oak balcony, and rich wood panelling in a large trading hall, which was reconstructed in 1911. History of Cardiff’s Coal Exchange Mount Stuart Square in Cardiff was a residential street with a central garden. As the city of Cardiff grew, the area was gradually taken over by businesses where business men would gather and coal merchants would use chalk to mark the prices of coal onto slates outside their premises. The Coal Exchange was constructed to form a centralised trading place, and became an important role in industrial Cardiff. Coal owners, ship owners and trading agents would meet daily on the floor of the trading hall, and during peak hours there could be as many as 200 men negotiating deals. It was estimated up to 10,000 people would pass through the doors every day! For a time, the price of the worlds coal was determined at Cardiff’s Coal Exchange, and the worlds first £1 million deal was made there in 1904. Cardiff relied heavily on the coal industry and the the Bute Docks eventually began to see a downturn in demand. The Coal Exchange closed in 1958, and coal exports came to an end in 1964. Coal Exchange, Cardiff - Trading hall in useThe building became Grade II* listed in 1975, and was used sporadically for TV filming until 1988 when it was purchased to be used as a major venue. It was extensively refurbished and from 2001 hosted acts such as the Arctic Monkeys, Van Morrison and the Stereophonics. The refurbishment retained the trading hall, although with the addition of a suspended ceiling hiding away the original glass roof. By 2013 serious safety issues concerning the structure forced the closure of the events venue. The building is now in varying states of decay – the west wing is still in use as offices by a number of business, whereas the east wing has seen many years of neglect, causing some floors to collapse and some areas have suffered a fire. The non-profit organisation ‘Save the Coal Exchange’ has done an excellent job of preserving the trading hall and main entrance which both remain in a good state of repair. Visited with @SpiderMonkey The clocks would be set daily to show AM and PM high-water times The huge trading hall was where business would be done Originally the ceiling was open up to the roof with a large glass skylight The original ironwork and skylight still remain above the suspended ceiling Behind the bar were some very nice stained glass windows Much of the building is now suffering a lot of decay Barclays Bank Some of the building was used by Barclays Bank and the vaults beneath still remain. There are many more areas to look around and the vaults had lots of interesting bits to shoot, but we ran out of time before we had to top up the parking meter.
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